Zusammenstellung ausgewählter Bilder zu den Apollo-Mondlandungen, die um weiterführenden Links mit der Möglichkeit des Downloads ergänzt wurden.

  • Landestellen der Apollo-Missionen auf dem Mond

    Landestellen der Apollo-Missionen auf dem Mond

    The NASA Apollo missions landed at six sites on the Moon between 1969 and 1972. As seen in this image, all of the sites are near the equator on the near side (the side facing the Earth).

    The text includes the total number of hours that the Lunar Module (LM, pronounced "lem") was on the surface along with the number of hours that the astronauts were actually outside — extravehicular activity or EVA in astronaut speak.

    The precise landing site coordinates are those recently determined from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) narrow angle camera images of the sites. The coordinates are listed here and in "Coordinates of anthropogenic features on the Moon" by Wagner et al. in the February, 2017 Icarus. The surface times are from Apollo by the Numbers by Orloff. Also see the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal, a complete and thoroughly annotated transcript of astronaut activities on the Moon.

    The amount of time that the astronauts were able to stay on the surface increased with each mission. Distance traveled during EVAs on the last three missions were greatly extended by a lunar rover, a battery-powered dune buggy that allowed the astronauts to visit and sample places several kilometers away from the LM.

    Bild: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • Erdaufgang über dem Mond, gesehen von Apollo 8

    Erdaufgang über dem Mond, gesehen von Apollo 8

    The rising Earth is about five degrees above the lunar horizon in this telephoto view taken from the Apollo 8 spacecraft near 110 degrees east longitude. The horizon, about 570 kilometers from the spacecraft, is near the eastern limb of the Moon as viewed from the Earth. On the earth, the sunset terminator crosses Africa. The south pole is in the white area near the left end of the terminator. North and South America are under the clouds. The lunar surface probably has less pronounced color than indicated by this print.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Dave Scott in der Luke der Kommandokapsel von Apollo 9

    Dave Scott in der Luke der Kommandokapsel von Apollo 9

    Excellent view of the docked Apollo 9 Command and Service Modules (CSM) and Lunar Module (LM), with Earth in the background, during astronaut David R. Scott's stand-up extravehicular activity (EVA), on the fourth day of the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission. Scott, command module pilot, is standing in the open hatch of the Command Module (CM). Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot, took this photograph of Scott from the porch of the LM. Inside the LM was astronaut James A. McDivitt, Apollo 9 commander.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Die Mondfähre von Apollo 9 über der Erdatmosphäre

    Die Mondfähre von Apollo 9 über der Erdatmosphäre

    Die Mondfähre über der Erdatmosphäre ...der vertrauten Erde. Der Apollo 9-Test des Rendezvous-Manövers im Erdorbit verlief erfolgreich - die Zeit drängte, der nächste Versuch erfolgte schon am Mond.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-11-Astronaut Edwin Aldrin posiert neben der US-Flagge

    Apollo-11-Astronaut Edwin Aldrin posiert neben der US-Flagge

    Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot of the first lunar landing mission, poses for a photograph beside the deployed United States flag during an Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. The Lunar Module (LM) is on the left, and the footprints of the astronauts are clearly visible in the soil of the moon. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this picture with a 70mm Hasselblad lunar surface camera. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the LM, the "Eagle", to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Aldrins Fuß und Schuhabdruck auf dem Mondboden, Apollo 11

    Aldrins Fuß und Schuhabdruck auf dem Mondboden, Apollo 11

    A close-up view of an astronaut's boot and bootprint in the lunar soil, photographed with a 70mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA). While astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin A. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM)" Columbia" in lunar orbit.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-11-Landemodul auf der Mondoberfläche

    Apollo-11-Landemodul auf der Mondoberfläche

    Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, prepares to deploy the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP) during the Apollo 11 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this picture with a 70mm lunar surface camera. During flight the EASEP is stowed in the Lunar Module's (LM) scientific equipment bay at the left year quadrant of the descent stage looking forward. Aldrin is removing the EASEP from its stowed position.

    Bild: NASA

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  • "Buzz" Aldrin am Seismometer, Apollo 11

    Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, is photographed during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity on the Moon. He has just deployed the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP). In the foreground is the Passive Seismic Experiment Package (PSEP); beyond it is the Laser Ranging RetroReflector (LR-3); in the center background is the United States flag; in the left background is the black and white lunar surface television camera; in the far right background is the Lunar Module. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Schuhabdruck im Mondboden, Apollo 11

    Schuhabdruck im Mondboden, Apollo 11

    A close-up view of an astronaut's bootprint in the lunar soil, photographed with a 70mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the moon. While astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

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  • Apollo-11-Astronaut Edwin Aldrin anf dem Mond

    Apollo-11-Astronaut Edwin Aldrin anf dem Mond

    Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the moon near the leg of the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-11-Astronaut Edwin Aldrin läuft auf dem Mond umher

    Apollo-11-Astronaut Edwin Aldrin läuft auf dem Mond umher

    Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the moon near a leg of the Lunar Module during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera. The astronauts' bootprints are clearly visible in the foreground. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-12-Astronaut bei Surveyor 3

    Apollo-12-Astronaut bei Surveyor 3

    This unusual photograph, taken during the second Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA), shows two U.S. spacecraft on the surface of the moon. The Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM) is in the background. The unmanned Surveyor 3 spacecraft is in the foreground. The Apollo 12 LM, with astronauts Charles Conrad Jr. and Alan L. Bean aboard, landed about 600 feet from Surveyor 3 in the Ocean of Storms. The television camera and several other pieces were taken from Surveyor 3 and brought back to Earth for scientific examination. Here, Conrad examines the Surveyor's TV camera prior to detaching it. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr. remained with the Apollo 12 Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while Conrad and Bean descended in the LM to explore the moon. Surveyor 3 soft-landed on the moon on April 19, 1967.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-12-Astronaut Alan Bean mit einem Probencontainer

    Apollo-12-Astronaut Alan Bean mit einem Probencontainer

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean holds a Special Environmental Sample Container filled with lunar soil collected during the extravehicular activity (EVA) in which astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander, and Bean, lunar module pilot, participated. Conrad, who took this picture, is reflected in Bean's helmet visor. Conrad and Bean descended in the Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM) to explore the lunar surface while astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Sonnenfinsternis von Apollo 12 aus gesehen

    Sonnenfinsternis von Apollo 12 aus gesehen

    This photograph of the eclipse of the sun was taken with a 16mm motion picture camera from the Apollo 12 spacecraft during its trans-Earth journey home from the moon. The fascinating view was created when the Earth moved directly between the sun and the Apollo 12 spacecraft. Aboard Apollo 12 were astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander; Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot; and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot. While astronauts Conrad and Bean descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Intrepid" to explore the Ocean of Storms region of the moon, astronaut Gordon remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Yankee Clipper" in lunar orbit.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-13-Service Modul mit Beschädigungen

    Apollo-13-Service Modul mit Beschädigungen

    This view of the damaged Apollo 13 Service Module (SM) was photographed from the Lunar Module/Command Module following SM jettisoning. As seen here, an entire panel on the SM was blown away by the apparent explosion of oxygen tank number two located in Sector 4 of the SM. Two of the three fuel cells are visible just forward (above) the heavily damaged area. Three fuel cells, two oxygen tanks, and two hydrogen tanks are locate in Sector 4. The damaged area is located above the S-band high gain antenna. Nearest the camera is the Service Propulsion System (SPS) engine and nozzle. The damage to the SM caused the Apollo 13 crewmen to use the Lunar Module (LM) as a "lifeboat". The LM was jettisoned just prior to Earth reentry by the Command Module.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-13-Astronauten beim Wechsel eines modifizierten tragbaren Lebenserhaltungssystems

    Apollo-13-Astronauten beim Wechsel eines modifizierten tragbaren Lebenserhaltungssystems

    An interior view of the Apollo 13 Lunar Module (LM) during the trouble-plagued journey back to Earth. This photograph shows some of the temporary hose connections and apparatus which were necessary when the three Apollo astronauts moved from the Command Module (CM) to use the LM as a "lifeboat". Astronaut John L. Swigert Jr., command module pilot, is on the right. An unidentified astronaut on the left holds in his right hand the feed water bag from the Portable Life Support System (PLSS). It is connected to a hose (center) from the Lunar Topographic (Hycon) Camera. In the background is the "mail box," a jury-rigged arrangement which the crew men built to use the CM lithium hydroxide canisters to scrub CO2 from the spacecraft's atmosphere. Since there was a limited amount of lithium hydroxide in the LM, this arrangement was rigged up to utilize the canisters from the CM. The "mail box" was designed and tested on the ground at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) before it was suggested to the Apollo 13 astronauts. An explosion of an oxygen tank in the Service Module (SM) caused the cancellation of the scheduled moon landing, and made the return home a hazardous journey for astronauts Swigert, James A. Lovell Jr., commander, and Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-14-Astroaut Ed Mitchell studiert die Karte

    Apollo-14-Astroaut Ed Mitchell studiert die Karte

    Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, moves across the lunar surface as he looks over a traverse map during an extravehicular activity (EVA). Lunar dust can be seen clinging to the boots and legs of the space suit. Astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander, and Mitchell explored the lunar surface while astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, orbited the moon in the Command and Service Modules (CSM).

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-14-Astronaut Alan Shephard mit dem Transportwägelchen

    Apollo-14-Astronaut Alan Shephard mit dem Transportwägelchen

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., Apollo 14 commander, assembles a double core tube as he stands beside the rickshaw-type portable workbench or modularized equipment transporter (MET) unique to this mission. The photograph was taken by astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, standing some 170 meters northeast of the Lunar Module (LM), during the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA) on Feb. 6, 1971. While astronauts Shepard and Mitchell descended in the LM "Antares" to explore the Fra Mauro region of the moon, astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Kitty Hawk" in lunar orbit.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-15-Astronaut James Irwin am Mondauto

    Apollo-15-Astronaut James Irwin am Mondauto

    Astronaut James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, works at the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) during the first Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Hadley-Apennine landing site. The Lunar Module (LM) "Falcon" is on the left. The undeployed Laser Ranging Retro Reflector (LR-3) lies atop the LM's modular equipment stowage assembly (MESA). This view is looking slightly west of south. Hadley Delta and the Apennine Front are in the background to the left. St. George crater is approximately five kilometers (about three statute miles) in the distance behind Irwin's head. This photograph was taken by astronaut David R. Scott, commander. While astronauts Scott and Irwin descended in the LM to explore the moon, astronaut Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Mondauto von Apollo 15

    Mondauto von Apollo 15

    The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is photographed alone against the desolate lunar background during the third Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Hadley-Apennine landing site. This view is looking north. The west edge of Mount Hadley is at the upper right edge of the picture. Mount Hadley rises approximately 4,500 meters (about 4,765 feet) above the plain. The most distant lunar feature visible is approximately 25 kilometers (about 15.5 statute miles) away. While astronauts David R. Scott, commander; and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Falcon" to explore the moon, astronaut Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-16-Astronaut Charlie Duke an Station 4

    Apollo-16-Astronaut Charlie Duke an Station 4

    Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, stands near the Lunar Roving Vehicle at Station no. 4, near Stone Mountain, during the second Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-2) at the Descartes landing site. Light rays from South Ray crater can be seen at upper left. The gnomon, which is used as a photographic reference to establish local vertical Sun angle, scale, and lunar color, is deployed in the center foreground. Note angularity of rocks in the area.

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  • Apollo-16-Astronaut bei der Untersuchung des House Rock

    Apollo-16-Astronaut bei der Untersuchung des House Rock

    Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, examines closely the surface of a large boulder at North Ray Crater during the third Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Descartes landing site. This picture was taken by astronaut John W. Young, commander. Note the chest-mounted 70mm Hasselblad camera. While astronauts Young and Duke descended in the Apollo 16 Lunar Module (LM) "Orion" to explore the Descartes highlands landing site on the moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Casper" in lunar orbit.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-16-Astronaut John Young mit einem Probenbeutel bei Station 10

    Apollo-16-Astronaut John Young mit einem Probenbeutel bei Station 10

    Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 16 commander, with a sample bag in his left hand, moves toward the bottom part of the gnomon (center) while collecting samples at the North Ray Crater geological site. Note how soiled Young's Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) is during this the third and final Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA). The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is parked at upper left.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-17-Astronaut Harrison Schmitt beim Einsammeln von Bodenproben

    Apollo-17-Astronaut Harrison Schmitt beim Einsammeln von Bodenproben

    Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, collects lunar rake samples at Station 1 during the first Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. This picture was taken by astronaut Eugene Cernan, commander. The lunar rake, an Apollo lunar geology hand tool, is used to collect discrete samples of rocks and rock chips ranging in size from one-half inch (1.3 centimeter) to one inch (2.5 centimeter).

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-17-Kommandant Eugene Cernan am geparkten Mondauto

    Apollo-17-Kommandant Eugene Cernan am geparkten Mondauto

    Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 commander, approaches the parked Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) on the lunar surface during the flight's third period of extravehicular activity (EVA). South Massif can be seen in the background. The photograph was taken with a hand-held Hasselblad camera by scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. While the two explored the surface of the moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-17-Astronaut Harrison Schmitt neben einem großen Felsblock

    Apollo-17-Astronaut Harrison Schmitt neben einem großen Felsblock

    Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt is photographed standing next to a huge, split lunar boulder during the third Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. Schmitt is the Apollo 17 lunar module pilot. This picture was taken by astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, commander. While Cernan and Schmitt descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules (CSM) "America" in lunar orbit.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Panorama der Apollo-17-Landestelle

    Panorama der Apollo-17-Landestelle

    Panorama view of Apollo 17 Lunar surface photos for use in presentations to NASA management and for Outreach Education in regard to new NASA initiative for human planetary research. Photo numbers used for this panoramic include: Apollo 17 start frame AS17-147-22572 thru end frame AS17-147-22600. View is of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP) Station taken during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 1.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Reparierter Kotflügel des Apollo-17-Mondautos

    Reparierter Kotflügel des Apollo-17-Mondautos

    A close-up view of the lunar roving vehicle (LRV) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site photographed during Apollo 17 lunar surface extravehicular activity. Note the makeshift repair arrangement on the right rear fender of the LRV. During EVA-1 a hammer got underneath the fender and a part of it was knocked off. Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan and Harrison H. Schmitt were reporting a problem with lunar dust because of the damage fender. Following a suggestion from astronaut John W. Young in the Mission Control Center at Houston the crewmen repaired the fender early in EVA-2 using lunar maps and clamps from the optical alignment telescope lamp. Schmitt is seated in the rover. Cernan took this picture.

    Bild: NASA

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  • Apollo-17-Astronaut Ronald Evans bei der Bergung von Filmkassetten

    Apollo-17-Astronaut Ronald Evans bei der Bergung von Filmkassetten

    Astronaut Ronald E. Evans is photographed performing extravehicular activity during the Apollo 17 spacecraft's trans-Earth coast. During his EVA, Evans, command module pilot, retrieved film cassettes from the lunar sounder, mapping camera and panoramic camera. The cylindrical object at Evans' left side is the mapping camera cassette. The total time for the trans-Earth EVA was one hour, seven minutes, 18 seconds, starting at ground elapsed time of 257:25 (2:28 p.m.) and ending at G.E.T. of 258:42 (3:35 p.m.) on Sunday, Dec. 17, 1972.

    Bild: NASA

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