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Zusammenstellung ausgewählter Bilder zum Mond, die um weiterführenden Links mit der Möglichkeit des Downloads ergänzt wurden.

  • Globale, farbverstärkte Ansicht des Mondes

    Globale, farbverstärkte Ansicht des Mondes

    During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Moon. The Galileo spacecraft took these images on December 7, 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the image is the Tycho impact basin. The dark areas are lava rock filled impact basins: Oceanus Procellarum (on the left), Mare Imbrium (center left), Mare Serenitatis and Mare Tranquillitatis (center), and Mare Crisium (near the right edge). This picture contains images through the Violet, 756 nm, 968 nm filters. The color is 'enhanced' in the sense that the CCD camera is sensitive to near infrared wavelengths of light beyond human vision. The Galileo project is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/USGS

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  • Zwei Ansichten des Mondes mit Oceanus Procellarum, Mare Imbrium, Mare Humorum und Mare Orientale

    Zwei Ansichten des Mondes mit Oceanus Procellarum, Mare Imbrium, Mare Humorum und Mare Orientale

    These pictures of the Moon were taken by the Galileo spacecraft at (right photo) 6:47 p.m. PST Dec.8, 1990 from a distance of almost 220,000 miles, and at (left photo) 9:35 a.m. PST Dec. 9, 1990 at a range of more than 350,000 miles. The picture on the right shows the dark Oceanus Procellarum in the upper center, with Mare Imbrium above it and the smaller circular Mare Humorum below. The Orientale Basin, with a small mare in its center, is on the lower left near the limb or edge. Between stretches the cratered highland terrain, with scattered bright young craters on highlands and maria alike. The picture at left shows the globe of the Moon rotated, putting Mare Imbrium on the eastern limb and moving the Orientale Basin almost to the center. The extent of the cratered highlands on the far side is very apparent. At lower left, near the limb, is the South Pole Aitken basin, similar to Orientale but very much older and some 1,200 miles in diameter. This feature was previously known as a large depression in the southern far side; this image shows its Orientale like structure and darkness relative to surrounding highlands.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Krater Copernicus auf dem Mond

    Krater Copernicus auf dem Mond

    In a change of venue from peering at the distant universe, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has taken a look at Earth's closest neighbor in space, the Moon. Hubble was aimed at one of the Moon's most dramatic and photogenic targets, the 58 mile-wide (93 km) impact crater Copernicus.

    upper left: The Moon is so close to Earth that Hubble would need to take a mosaic of 130 pictures to cover the entire disk. This ground-based picture from Lick Observatory shows the area covered in Hubble's photomosaic with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.

    center: Hubble's crisp bird's-eye view clearly shows the ray pattern of bright dust ejected out of the crater over one billion years ago, when an asteroid larger than a mile across slammed into the Moon. Hubble can resolve features as small as 600 feet across in the terraced walls of the crater, and the hummock-like blanket of material blasted out by the meteor impact.

    lower right: A close-up view of Copernicus' terraced walls. Hubble can resolve features as small as 280 feet across.

    Bild: John Caldwell (York University, Ontario), Alex Storrs (STScI), and NASA

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  • Lavaflüsse im Mare Imbrium

    Lavaflüsse im Mare Imbrium

    North-facing oblique Metric Camera image of eastern Mare Imbrium including Mons La Hire and the wrinkle ridges, Dorsum Zirkel and Dorsum Heim.

    Bild: NASA/ASU

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  • Schrägansicht des Zentralberges im Kraters Tycho auf dem Mond

    Schrägansicht des Zentralberges im Kraters Tycho auf dem Mond

    On 10 June 2011 the LRO spacecraft slewed 65° to the west, allowing the LROC NACs to capture this dramatic sunrise view of Tycho crater. A very popular target with amateur astronomers, Tycho is located at 43.37°S, 348.68°E, and is ~82 km in diameter.

    The summit of the central peak is 2 km above the crater floor, and the crater floor is about 4700 mbelow the rim. Many "clasts" ranging in size from 10 meters to 100s of meters are exposed in the central peak slopes. NAC oblique view of Tycho crater highlights the summit area of this spectacular image. The central peak complex is about 15 km wide southeast to northwest (left to right in this view)

    Tycho's features are so steep and sharp because the crater is young by lunar standards, only about 110 million years old. Over time, micrometeorites, and not so micro meteorites, will grind and erode these steep slopes into smooth mountains.

    Bild: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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  • Schrägansicht des Kraters Copernicus auf dem Mond

    Schrägansicht des Kraters Copernicus auf dem Mond

    Copernicus crater central peak casts a long shadow to the west over a crater floor that was flooded with impact melt that cooled and hardened to form this spectacular landscape. On May 5th, 2012 LRO slewed 63° to capture this LROC image of the interior of Copernicus crater (9.62°N, 339.92°E, 93 km in diameter). The central peaks immediately capture your eye, with the tallest peak rising one kilometer above the floor of the crater. For comparison, the Grand Canyon has an average depth of 1.6 km. During the impact that formed Copernicus crater, an unimaginable amount of kinetic energy was transferred instantaneously into the surface. After the excavation stage of the impact, the initial transient crater collapsed under the force of gravity causing the crater rim to move inward, and the central region rebounded (uplifts) to form the central peaks! Central peaks only form in craters larger than 15-20 km in diameter on the Moon. The rock that forms the central peak originates from the greatest depth of all the material excavated by the crater. For that reason, scientists are very interested in the composition of central peaks, since the material tells us what lies deep beneath the surface of the lunar crust; studying central peaks of large craters is therefore one of the best ways, absent returned samples, to probe the composition of the lunar interior. Recent remote sensing studies using Moon Mineralogy Mapper spectra confirmed the presence of relatively unusual olivine-rich material in the central peaks of Copernicus. Are we sensing the upper portions of the mantle, or magma Copernicus crater also plays an important role in our understanding of the lunar geologic timescale.

    Bild: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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  • Krater Copernicus, aufgenommen von Lunar Orbiter

    Krater Copernicus, aufgenommen von Lunar Orbiter

    Copernicus is 93 km wide and is located within the Mare Imbrium Basin, northern nearside of the Moon (10 degrees N., 20 degrees W.). Image shows crater floor, floor mounds, rim, and rayed ejecta. Rays from the ejecta are superposed on all other surrounding terrains which places the crater in its namesake age group: the Copernican system, established as the youngest assemblage of rocks on the Moon (Shoemaker and Hackman, 1962, The Moon: London, Academic Press, p.289- 300).

    Bild: NASA/JPL/USGS

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  • Nordpolregion des Mondes

    Nordpolregion des Mondes

    During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Moon. The Galileo spacecraft surveyed the Moon on December 7, 1992, on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-1997. The left part of this north pole view is visible from Earth. This color picture is a mosaic assembled from 18 images taken by Galileo's imaging system through a green filter. The left part of this picture shows the dark, lava-filled Mare Imbrium (upper left); Mare Serenitatis (middle left), Mare Tranquillitatis (lower left), and Mare Crisium, the dark circular feature toward the bottom of the mosaic. Also visible in this view are the dark lava plains of the Marginis and Smythii Basins at the lower right. The Humboldtianum Basin, a 650-kilometer (400-mile) impact structure partly filled with dark volcanic deposits, is seen at the center of the image. The Moon's north pole is located just inside the shadow zone, about a third of the way from the top left of the illuminated region. The Galileo project is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/USGS

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  • Mond - von Cassini gesehen

    Mond - von Cassini gesehen

    This narrow angle image taken by Cassini's camera system of the Moon is one of the best of a sequence of narrow angle frames taken as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. The 80 millisecond exposure was taken through a spectral filter centered at 0.33 microns; the filter bandpass was 85 Angstroms wide. The spatial scale of the image is about about 2.3 kilometers per pixel. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Mond, Krater Alphonsus, Ptolemaeus und Arzachel im Mare Nubium

    Mond, Krater Alphonsus, Ptolemaeus und Arzachel im Mare Nubium

    Ranger 7 took this image, the first picture of the Moon by a U.S. spacecraft, on 31 July 1964 at 13:09 UT (9:09 AM EDT) about 17 minutes before impacting the lunar surface. The area photographed is centered at 13 S, 10 W and covers about 360 km from top to bottom. The large crater at center right is the 108 km diameter Alphonsus. Above it is Ptolemaeus and below it Arzachel. The terminator is at the bottom right corner. Mare Nubium is at center and left. Nor this at about 11:00 at the center of the frame. The Ranger 7impact site is off the frame, to the left of the upper left corner.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Mond, Schrägblick über den nördlichen Rand des Kraters Cabeus bei niedrigem Sonnenstand

    Mond, Schrägblick über den nördlichen Rand des Kraters Cabeus bei niedrigem Sonnenstand

    Most mountains on the Earth are formed as plates collide and the crust buckles. Not so for the Moon, where mountains are formed as a result of impacts. Images taken looking across the landscape rather than straight down really bring out topography and help us visualize the lunar landscape. However such images can only be taken as the spacecraft rolls to the side, in this case about 70°, so the opportunities are limited. Foreground is about 15 km wide, view is northeast across the north rim of Cabeus crater.

    Cabeus crater is relatively old, 100 km in diameter, and contains significant areas of permanent shadow. Such regions are of great interest because they may harbor significant deposits of ices (water, methane, etc).

    Bild: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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  • Ejekta im Krater Tycho

    Ejekta im Krater Tycho

    320 meter (1050 feet) block of ejecta in Tycho crater covered by a veneer of impact melt. Image width is 370 meters (1214 feet), LROC NAC 142334392RE.

    Tycho crater is a Copernican age crater (85 kilometers diameter) located at 43.3°S, 11.2°W. It is named for the 16th century Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe and is one of the most visible features on the near side of the Moon. Its ray system is so obvious and widespread that Apollo 17 astronauts sampled its ejecta, over 2000 kilometers away from the crater. Scientists dated the Tycho samples at about 110 Ma. We also have surface views of Tycho's ejecta blanket taken by the Surveyor 7 soft lander.

    Bild: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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  • Mond, Krater Copernicus im Ultraviolett

    Mond, Krater Copernicus im Ultraviolett

    LROC Wide Angle Camera (WAC) visible to ultraviolet portrait of Copernicus crater, image 458 kilometers wide.

    Understanding how scientists determine the relative age of geologic units on the Moon is straightforward, most of the time. One simply follows the law of superposition; what is on top is younger, what is below is older. In some cases, superposition relations are not clear, so scientists then compare crater densities. That is the number of impact craters on a common size of ground. Since impacts occur randomly both in time and on the Moon's surface, any piece of ground has an equal chance of being hit. Over time, the number craters in a given area increases. Simply stated, the older an area the more craters you will find.

    Bild: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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  • Teil eines gewundenen Abhangs im Inneren des Kraters Karrer

    Teil eines gewundenen Abhangs im Inneren des Kraters Karrer

    A section of a lobate scarp inside Karrer crater. NAC frame M145557281R, incidence is 71°, image is 0.64 m/px.

    Karrer crater (52.13°S, 142.31°W) is mare-filled crater on the far side of the Moon, approximately 51 km in diameter. Karrer is special because there are fewer mare basalt surfaces on the far side compared to the near side of the Moon. Within Karrer crater's mare basalt covered floor is a lobate scarp, unofficially designated as Karrer scarp for the crater within which it is located. Today's image shows a section of this scarp, where the deformation of the mare basalt is close to forming the shape of two right angles. Mare basalt surfaces often have lobate scarps and wrinkle ridges, two types of contractional tectonic features.

    Bild: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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  • Mosaik des Mondes aus Weitwinkelaufnahmen mit Mare Orientale im Mittelpunkt

    Mosaik des Mondes aus Weitwinkelaufnahmen mit Mare Orientale im Mittelpunkt

    LROC WAC mosaic centered on Orientale basin. From the center of the mosaic to a corner is about 2000 km.

    This image is an orthographic reprojection of the WAC global mosaic centered on the youngest large basin on the Moon, Orientale. This basin is barely visible on the western limb of the Moon as seen from the Earth. Its existence was not confirmed until spacecraft sent back images of the farside 50 years ago. Unlike other large basins, Orientale has very little volcanic materials filling its interior, so the basin structure is easily seen. The inner and outer basin rings are particulary obvious - imagine if the Moon were rotated 90° and the Orientale basin faced the Earth. What sort of mythology would have grown up around the great eyeball in the sky?

    Bild: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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  • Freigelegte Lavaschichten am Rand des Kraters Bessel

    Freigelegte Lavaschichten am Rand des Kraters Bessel

    Spectacular example of layering exposed in the wall of Bessel crater (21.8°N, 17.9°E). Image number M135073175R, incidence angle 13°, image is 500 meters across. The outcrops exposed on the interior wall of Bessel crater (~16 km in diameter) are remarkable since they are most likely preserved layering of mare basalt. Today's Featured Image shows a portion of the northern wall, which contains multiple layers that probably represent discrete lava flow deposits in Mare Serenitatis. Over time, large, but relatively thin, lava flows spread across the extent of Mare Serenitatis. Lunar pits imaged by LROC also give us a good look at basalt flow layers. Boulders broken off of the mare layers tumble down the wall toward the floor of the crater. Bessel crater is named after Friedrich Bessel, the developer of Bessel functions. By measuring the thickness of layering found in Bessel and other craters, scientists can put constraints on the thickness of individual lava flows. What else can Bessel crater tell us about Mare Serenitatis?

    Bild: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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  • Möglicherweise vulkanische Aufwölbung mit Gipfelkaldera am Rand des Kraters Eddington

    Möglicherweise vulkanische Aufwölbung mit Gipfelkaldera am Rand des Kraters Eddington

    Along the embayed Eddington crater rim is an ~1.5 km dome that may be an ancient volcano with a summit pit crater. LROC NAC M148618400R, image width is 960 meters.

    Volcanic features are observed all over the Moon, but sometimes it is difficult to tell whether an observed feature is of volcanic origin or the remnant of another geologic feature (e.g., basin ejecta or buried rim materials). Today's Featured Image is a prime example of a dome that may or may not be of volcanic origin. The dome is ~1.5 km wide and has a summit crater, but is the crater of impact or volcanic origin? The dome is geomorphologically similar to two volcanoes found in Lacus Mortis. These other domes are about the same size (~1.5 km wide) and have similar appearances, except that today's feature has many more small superposed impacts, suggesting that it is older than the Lacus Mortis volcanoes. Does it mean that this feature in western Oceanus Procellarum is a volcano just because it looks like one? The simple answer is no; but keep reading to find out why.

    Bild: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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  • Mond, Runzelrücken im Mare Frigoris

    Mond, Runzelrücken im Mare Frigoris

    Scientists have discovered these wrinkle ridges in a region of the Moon called Mare Frigoris. These ridges add to evidence that the Moon has an actively changing surface. This image was taken by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO).

    Bild: NASA

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  • Gräben nahe Mare Frigoris

    Gräben nahe Mare Frigoris

    These graben - a kind of trench that is formed as a surface expands - were imaged near a region of the Moon called Mare Frigoris by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO).

    Bild: NASA

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  • Globales hochaufgelöstes Mosaik der Mondvorderseite

    Globales hochaufgelöstes Mosaik der Mondvorderseite

    LROC WAC mosaic of the lunar nearside.

    For two weeks in mid-December 2010, the LRO spacecraft remained nadir looking (straight down) so that the LROC Wide Angle Camera (WAC) could acquire ~1300 images, allowing the LROC team to construct this spectacular mosaic. As the Moon rotated under LRO's orbit, the ground track progressed from east to west (right to left in this mosaic), and the incidence angle at the equator increased from 69° to 82° (at noontime the incidence angle is 0°).

    Bild: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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  • Mond, globales Mosaik der Mondrückseite

    Mond, globales Mosaik der Mondrückseite

    The lunar farside as never seen before! LROC WAC orthographic projection centered at 180° longitude, 0° latitude.

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center built and manages the mission for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera was designed to acquire data for landing site certification and to conduct polar illumination studies and global mapping. Operated by Arizona State University, LROC consists of a pair of narrow-angle cameras (NAC) and a single wide-angle camera (WAC). The mission is expected to return over 70 terabytes of image data.

    Bild: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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  • Globales farbkodiertes Geländemodell der Mondrückseite

    Globales farbkodiertes Geländemodell der Mondrückseite

    LROC WAC color shaded relief of the lunar farside (NASA/GSFC /DLR/Arizona State University).

    This amazing map shows you the ups and downs over nearly the entire Moon, at a scale of 100 meters across the surface, and 20 meters or better vertically. Despite the diminutive size of the WAC (it fits in the palm of one's hand), it images nearly the entire Moon every month. Each month the Moon's lighting changes, so the WAC methodically builds up a record of how different rocks reflect light under different conditions, and adds to the LROC library of stereo observations.

    The WAC has a pixel scale of about 75 meters, and with an average altitude of 50 km, a WAC image swath is 70 km wide across the ground-track. Because the equatorial distance between orbits is about 30 km, there is nearly complete orbit-to-orbit stereo overlap all the way around the Moon, every month. Using digital photogrammetric techniques, a terrain model was computed from this stereo overlap. The new topographic model was constructed from 69,000 WAC stereo models. Due to persistent shadows near the poles it is not possible to create a complete WAC stereo map at the very highest latitudes. Fortunately, the LRO Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) excels at characterizing the topography of the poles. Since the LRO orbits converge at the poles and LOLA ranges to the surface with its own lasers, LOLA provides a very high resolution topographic model of the poles. This LOLA map can fill in the WAC "hole at the pole".

    Bild: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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  • Globales farbkodiertes Geländemodell der Mondvorderseite

    Globales farbkodiertes Geländemodell der Mondvorderseite

    LROC WAC color shaded relief of the lunar nearside (NASA/GSFC /DLR/Arizona State University).

    This amazing map shows you the ups and downs over nearly the entire Moon, at a scale of 100 meters across the surface, and 20 meters or better vertically. Despite the diminutive size of the WAC (it fits in the palm of one's hand), it images nearly the entire Moon every month. Each month the Moon's lighting changes, so the WAC methodically builds up a record of how different rocks reflect light under different conditions, and adds to the LROC library of stereo observations.

    The WAC has a pixel scale of about 75 meters, and with an average altitude of 50 km, a WAC image swath is 70 km wide across the ground-track. Because the equatorial distance between orbits is about 30 km, there is nearly complete orbit-to-orbit stereo overlap all the way around the Moon, every month. Using digital photogrammetric techniques, a terrain model was computed from this stereo overlap. The new topographic model was constructed from 69,000 WAC stereo models. Due to persistent shadows near the poles it is not possible to create a complete WAC stereo map at the very highest latitudes. Fortunately, the LRO Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) excels at characterizing the topography of the poles. Since the LRO orbits converge at the poles and LOLA ranges to the surface with its own lasers, LOLA provides a very high resolution topographic model of the poles. This LOLA map can fill in the WAC "hole at the pole".

    Bild: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

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