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Zusammenstellung ausgewählter Bilder zu den Kometen, die um weiterführenden Links mit der Möglichkeit des Downloads ergänzt wurden.

  • Komet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), Kitt Peak Observatory

    Komet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), Kitt Peak Observatory

    This image of comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) was taken at the WIYN 0.9-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, Ariz., on May 7, 2004.

    The image was captured with the Mosaic I camera, which has a one-square degree field of view, or about five times the size of the Moon. Even with this large field, only the comet's coma and the inner portion of its tail are visible. A small star cluster (C0736-105, or Melotte 72) is visible in the lower right of the image, between the head of the comet and the bright red star in the lower-right corner.

    Bild: NASA, NOAO, NSF, T. Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage), Z. Levay and L.Frattare (Space Telescope Science Institute)

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  • Komet ISON am 9. Oktober 2013

    Komet ISON am 9. Oktober 2013

    A new image of the sunward plunging Comet ISON suggests that the comet is intact despite some predictions that the fragile icy nucleus might disintegrate as the Sun warms it. The comet will pass closest to the Sun on November 28.

    In this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image taken on October 9, the comet's solid nucleus is unresolved because it is so small. If the nucleus broke apart then Hubble would have likely seen evidence for multiple fragments.

    Moreover, the coma or head surrounding the comet's nucleus is symmetric and smooth. This would probably not be the case if clusters of smaller fragments were flying along. A polar jet of dust first seen in Hubble images taken in April is no longer visible and may have turned off.

    Bild: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

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  • Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Farbansicht

    Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Farbansicht

    A colour image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko composed of three images taken by Rosetta's scientific imaging system OSIRIS in the red, green and blue filters. The images were taken on 6 August 2014 from a distance of 120 kilometres from the comet.

    Bild: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

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  • Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko kurz vor Erreichen des Perihelions

    Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko kurz vor Erreichen des Perihelions

    This image of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko was captured by Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera on 12 August 2015 at 17:35 GMT, just a few hours before the comet reached the closest point to the Sun along its 6.5-year orbit, or perihelion.

    The image was taken from a distance of about 330 km from the comet. The comet’s activity, at its peak intensity around perihelion and in the weeks that follow, is clearly visible, including a significant outburst.

    Bild: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

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  • Detail des Kometen Churyumov-Gerasimenko am 6.8.2014 aus 130 km Entfernung

    Detail des Kometen Churyumov-Gerasimenko am 6.8.2014 aus 130 km Entfernung

    Stunning close up detail focusing on a smooth region on the ‘base’ of the ‘body’ section of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The image was taken by Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera and downloaded today, 6 August. The image clearly shows a range of features, including boulders, craters and steep cliffs.

    The image was taken from a distance of 130 km and the image resolution is 2.4 metres per pixel.

    Bild: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

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  • Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko am 30.9.2016

    Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko am 30.9.2016

    Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera captured this image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko at 08:18 GMT from an altitude of about 5.8 km during the spacecraft’s final descent on 30 September. The image scale is about 11 cm/pixel and the image measures about 225 m across.

    Bild: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

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  • Komet Churyumov-Gerasimenko am 15. April 2015 aus 165 km Entfernung

    Komet Churyumov-Gerasimenko am 15. April 2015 aus 165 km Entfernung

    This single frame Rosetta navigation camera image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was taken on 15 April 2015 from a distance of 165 km from the comet centre. The image has a resolution of 14 m/pixel and measures 10.4 km across.

    Bild: ESA/Rosetta/NavCam – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

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  • Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko am 15.6.2016 aus 34,1 km Entfernung

    Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko am 15.6.2016 aus 34,1 km Entfernung

    OSIRIS narrow-angle camera image taken on 15 June 2016, when Rosetta was 34.1 km from the centre of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. The scale is 0.62 m/pixel and the image measures about 1.3 km across.

    Bild: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

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  • Komet Churyumov-Gerasimenko am 3.8.2014 aus 285 km Entfernung

    Komet Churyumov-Gerasimenko am 3.8.2014 aus 285 km Entfernung

    Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by Rosetta's OSIRIS narrow-angle camera on August 3, 2014, from a distance of 177 miles (285 kilometers). The image resolution is 17 feet (5.3 meters) per pixel.

    Bild: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

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  • Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko am 9.2.2015 aus 105 km Entfernung

    Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko am 9.2.2015 aus 105 km Entfernung

    This single frame Rosetta navigation camera image was taken from a distance of 105 km from the centre of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 9 February 2015. The image has a resolution of 8.9 m/pixel and the crop shown here measures 9.1 km across. The image is processed to bring out the details of the comet's activity.

    Bild: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

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  • Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Region Hapi in Falschfarben

    Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Region Hapi in Falschfarben

    False-colour image showing the smooth Hapi region connecting the head and body of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Differences in reflectivity have been enhanced in this image to emphasise the blueish colour of the Hapi region. By studying the reflectivity, clues to the local composition of the comet are revealed. Here, the blue colouring might point to the presence of frozen water ice at or just below the dusty surface.

    The data used to create this image were acquired on 21 August 2014 when Rosetta was 70 km from the comet.

    Bild: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

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  • Komet67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko mit auffälligem kurzlebigem Jet

    Komet67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko mit auffälligem kurzlebigem Jet

    A short-lived outburst from Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko was captured by Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera on 29 July 2015. The image at left was taken at 13:06 GMT and does not show any visible signs of the jet. It is very strong in the middle image captured at 13:24 GMT. Residual traces of activity are only very faintly visible in the final image taken at 13:42 GMT.

    The images were taken from a distance of 186 km from the centre of the comet. The jet is estimated to have a minimum speed of 10 m/s and originates from a location on the comet’s neck, in the rugged Anuket region.

    Bild: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

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  • Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, rekonstruierte letzte Aufnahme von OSIRIS

    Komet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, rekonstruierte letzte Aufnahme von OSIRIS

    A final image from Rosetta, shortly before it made a controlled impact onto Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko on 30 September 2016, was reconstructed from residual telemetry.

    The image has a scale of 2 mm/pixel and measures about 1 m across.

    Bild: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

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  • Komet Tempel 1 mit hellem Lichtfleck 67 Sekunden nach Einschlag des Projektils

    Komet Tempel 1 mit hellem Lichtfleck 67 Sekunden nach Einschlag des Projektils

    This spectacular image of comet Tempel 1 was taken 67 seconds after it obliterated Deep Impact's impactor spacecraft. The image was taken by the high-resolution camera on the mission's flyby craft. Scattered light from the collision saturated the camera's detector, creating the bright splash seen here. Linear spokes of light radiate away from the impact site, while reflected sunlight illuminates most of the comet surface. The image reveals topographic features, including ridges, scalloped edges and possibly impact craters formed long ago.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UMD

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  • Kern des Kometen Tempel 1, Mosaik aus mehreren Aufnahmen

    Kern des Kometen Tempel 1, Mosaik aus mehreren Aufnahmen

    This composite image was built up from scaling all images to 5 meters/pixel, and aligning images to fixed points. Each image at closer range, replaced equivalent locations observed at a greater distance. The impact site has the highest resolution because images were acquired until about 4 sec from impact or a few meters from the surface.

    Arrows a and b point to large, smooth regions. The impact site is indicated by the third large arrow. Small arrows highlight a scarp that is bright due to illumination angle, which shows the smooth area to be elevated above the extremely rough terrain. The scale bar is 1 km and the two arrows above the nucleus point to the sun and the rotational axis of the nucleus. Celestial north is near the rotational pole.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/UMD

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  • Komet Wild 2, beste globale Aufnahme während des Vorbeiflugs am 2. Januar 2004

    Komet Wild 2, beste globale Aufnahme während des Vorbeiflugs am 2. Januar 2004

    This image shows the comet Wild 2, which NASA's Stardust spacecraft flew by on Jan. 2, 2004. This image is the closest short exposure of the comet, taken at an11.4-degree phase angle, the angle between the camera, comet and the Sun. The listed names on the diagram (see Figure 1) are those used by the Stardust team to identify features. "Basin" does not imply an impact origin.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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  • Nahaufnahme des Kerns des Kometen Hartley 2 mit erkennbaren Jets

    Nahaufnahme des Kerns des Kometen Hartley 2 mit erkennbaren Jets

    This enhanced image, one of the closest taken of comet Hartley 2 by NASA's EPOXI mission, shows jets and where they originate from the surface. There are jets outgassing from the sunward side, the night side, and along the terminator - the line between the two sides.

    The image was taken by EPOXI's Medium-Resolution Instrument on Nov. 4, 2010. The sun is to the right.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UMD

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  • Komet Hartley 2, fünf verschiedene Ansichten des Kerns während des Vorbeiflugs am Kometen

    Komet Hartley 2, fünf verschiedene Ansichten des Kerns während des Vorbeiflugs am Kometen

    This image montage shows comet Hartley 2 as NASA's EPOXI mission approached and flew under the comet. The images progress in time clockwise, starting at the top left.

    The image was taken by EPOXI's Medium-Resolution Instrument on Nov. 4, 2010. The sun is to the right.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UMD

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  • Komet Tempel 1, vier verschiedene globale Ansichten

    Komet Tempel 1, vier verschiedene globale Ansichten

    This image mosaic shows four different views of comet Tempel 1 as seen by NASA's Stardust spacecraft as it flew by on Feb. 14, 2011. The images progress in time beginning at upper left, moving to upper right, then proceeding from lower left to lower right. When the spacecraft first approached, it got a clear look at the same surface that was imaged previously by NASA's Deep Impact mission in 2005. Deep Impact sent a projectile into the comet, creating a crater that is located in the upper left image, but is difficult to see at this particular contrast level.

    As Stardust flew closer to the comet, it began to see new territory that had not been imaged before. The new territory appears on the left side of the upper right image. The Deep Impact crater is also located in this view, on the right side.

    Both the upper right and lower left images are the closest approach images for Stardust, taken at 3 seconds before, and 3 seconds after, the closest approach. The images were taken from a distance of about 185 kilometers (115 miles). In the lower left image, the vast majority of terrain pictured had not been seen until now. The fourth image, at lower right, shows Stardust's view as the spacecraft was on the way out. The image at upper left was taken 15 seconds before the encounter, or closest approach, from a distance of 244 kilometers (152 miles); the image at lower right was taken 15 seconds after encounter, from a distance of 245 kilometers (152 miles).

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell

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  • Interstellarer Komet 2I/Borisov am Perihelion, Aufnahme vom 9.12.2019

    Interstellarer Komet 2I/Borisov am Perihelion, Aufnahme vom 9.12.2019

    Hubble revisited comet 2I/Borisov on Dec. 9, 2019, shortly after its closest approach to the Sun where it received maximum heating after spending most of its life in frigid interstellar space. The comet also reached a breathtaking maximum speed of about 100,000 miles per hour. Comet Borisov is 185 million miles from Earth in this photo, near the inner edge of the asteroid belt but below it. The nucleus, an agglomeration of ices and dust, is still too small to be resolved. The bright central portion is a coma made up of dust leaving the surface. The comet will make its closest approach to Earth in late December at a distance of 180 million miles.

    Bild: NASA, ESA, and D. Jewitt (UCLA)

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  • Auseinander gebrochener Komet C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS)

    Auseinander gebrochener Komet C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS)

    This pair of Hubble Space Telescope images of comet C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS), taken on April 20 and April 23, 2020, reveal the breakup of the solid nucleus of the comet. Hubble photos identify as many as 30 separate fragments. The comet was approximately 91 million miles from Earth when the images were taken. The comet may be a broken off piece of a larger comet that swung by the Sun 5,000 years ago. The comet has been artificially colored in this view to enhance details for analysis.

    Bild:
    SCIENCE: NASA, ESA, Quanzhi Ye (UMD)
    IMAGE PROCESSING: Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

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  • Die einzelnen Fragmente des Kometen P/Shoemaker-Levy 9

    Die einzelnen Fragmente des Kometen P/Shoemaker-Levy 9

    A NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9, taken on May 17, 1994, with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) in wide field mode.

    When the comet was observed, its train of 21 icy fragments stretched across 710 thousand miles (1.1 million km) of space, or 3 times the distance between Earth and the Moon. This required 6 WFPC exposures spaced along the comet train to include all the nuclei. The image was taken in red light.

    The comet was approximately 410 million miles (660 million km) from Earth when the picture was taken, on a mid4uly collision course with the gas giant planet Jupiter.

    Bild: NASA, ESA, and H. Weaver and E. Smith (STScI)

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  • Komet Wild 2, aufgenommen während des Anflugs von Stardust auf den Kometen

    Komet Wild 2, aufgenommen während des Anflugs von Stardust auf den Kometen

    This image was taken during the close approach phase of Stardust's Jan 2, 2004 flyby of comet Wild 2. It is a distant side view of the roughly spherical comet nucleus. One hemisphere is in sunlight and the other is in shadow analogous to a view of the quarter moon. Several large depressed regions can be seen. Comet Wild 2 is about five kilometers (3.1 miles) in diameter.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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  • Jupiter mit acht sichtbaren Einschlagsstellen des Kometen Shoemaker-Levy 9

    Jupiter mit acht sichtbaren Einschlagsstellen des Kometen Shoemaker-Levy 9

    Image of Jupiter with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope's Planetary Camera. Eight impact sights are visible. From left to right are the E/F complex (barley visible on the edge of the planet), the star shaped H site, the impact sites for tiny N, Q1, small Q2, and R, and on the far right limb the D/G complex. The D/G complex also shows extended haze at the edge of the planet. The features are rapidly evolving on timescales of days. The smallest features in the this image are less than 200 kilometers across. This image is a color composite of three filters at 9530, 550, and 4100 Angstroms.

    Bild: Hubble Space Telescope Comet Team and NASA

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