Zum Inhalt springen Zur Navigation springen
Zeige Navigation

Zusammenstellung ausgewählter Bilder zu den Zwergplaneten, die um weiterführenden Links mit der Möglichkeit des Downloads ergänzt wurden.

  • Zwergplanet Eris (2003 UB313) und Mond Dysnomia, künstlerische Darstellung

    Zwergplanet Eris (2003 UB313) und Mond Dysnomia, künstlerische Darstellung

    This is an artist's concept of Kuiper Belt object Eris (2003 UB313() and its satellite Dysnomia.

    Ground-based observations suggested that Eris was about 30 percent greater in diameter than Pluto, but Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys images, taken on Dec. 9 and 10, 2005, yielded a diameter of 1,490 miles (with an uncertainty of 60 miles) for Eris. Pluto's diameter, as measured by Hubble, is 1,422 miles.

    Eris is the large object at the bottom of this artist's concept. A portion of its surface is lit by the Sun, located in the upper left corner of the image. Eris's companion, Dysnomia, is located just above and to the left of Eris.

    Bild: NASA, ESA, and A. Schaller (for STScI)

    Read more

  • Zwergplanet Eris mit Mond Dysnomia

    Zwergplanet Eris mit Mond Dysnomia

    Hubble View of Eris and Dysnomia

    [Left] - This is an image of the dwarf planet Eris (center) and its satellite Dysnomia (at 9 o'clock position) taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope on Aug. 30, 2006. Hubble observations were obtained on Dec. 3, 2005 and Aug. 30, 2006 using the Advanced Camera for Surveys. The Hubble images were combined with images from the Keck telescopes taken on Aug. 20, 21, 30, and 31 to measure the satellite's orbit and calculate a mass for Eris, which is the largest dwarf planet in the solar system.

    [Right] - Labeled version of the above mentioned image of dwarf planet Eris and its satellite Dysnomia taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope on Aug. 30, 2006. Dysnomia's projected orbit around Eris is superimposed on the image.

    Credit: NASA, ESA, and M. Brown (California Institute of Technology)

    Read more

  • Zwergplanet Makemake und sein Mond im Kuiper-Gürtel

    Zwergplanet Makemake und sein Mond im Kuiper-Gürtel

    This Hubble Space Telescope image reveals the first moon ever discovered around the dwarf planet Makemake. The tiny moon, located just above Makemake in this image, is barely visible because it is almost lost in the glare of the very bright dwarf planet. The moon, nicknamed MK 2, is roughly 100 miles wide and orbits about 13,000 miles from Makemake. Makemake is 1,300 times brighter than its moon and is also much larger, at 870 miles across.

    The Makemake system is more than 50 times farther than the Earth is from the sun. The pair resides on the outskirts of our solar system in the Kuiper Belt, a vast region of frozen debris from the construction of our solar system 4.5 billion years ago.

    Previous searches for a moon around Makemake turned up empty. The moon may be in an edge-on orbit, so part of the time it gets lost in the bright glare of Makemake. Hubble's sharp-eyed Wide Field Camera 3 made the observation in April 2015.

    Bild: NASA, ESA, A. Parker and M. Buie (Southwest Research Institute), W. Grundy (Lowell Observatory), and K. Noll (NASA GSFC)

    Read more

  • Ceres aus 46.000 km Entfernung

    Ceres aus 46.000 km Entfernung

    The surface of Ceres is covered with craters of many shapes and sizes, as seen in this new map of the dwarf planet's surface. To make this a map of Ceres, comprised of images captured by NASA's Dawn spacecraft on Feb. 19, 2015 from a distance of nearly 29,000 miles (46,000 kilometers), was projected onto a globe.

    An unusually large basin nearly 186 miles (300 kilometers) across is seen just south of the equator, with a shallow interior, faint rim and low-relief mounds within. Several bright spots are seen, including two that are very bright and lie within a single crater north of the equator. The bright spot in the center of that crater too small to be resolved at this distance, so its true brightness is not yet known.

    An unusually large basin nearly 186 miles (300 kilometers) across is seen just south of the equator, with a shallow interior, faint rim and low-relief mounds within. Several bright spots are seen, including two that are very bright and lie within a single crater north of the equator. The bright spot in the center of that crater too small to be resolved at this distance, so its true brightness is not yet known.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

    Read more

  • Ceres, zwei globale Ansichten vom 12.2.2015 aus 83.000 km Entfernung im Abstand von 10 Stunden

    Ceres, zwei globale Ansichten vom 12.2.2015 aus 83.000 km Entfernung im Abstand von 10 Stunden

    These two views of Ceres were acquired by NASA's Dawn spacecraft on Feb. 12, 2015, from a distance of about 52,000 miles (83,000 kilometers) as the dwarf planet rotated. The images, which were taken about 10 hours apart, have been magnified from their original size.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

    Read more

  • Ceres, zwei globale topographische Ansichten mit farbkodierter Höhe

    Ceres, zwei globale topographische Ansichten mit farbkodierter Höhe

    This pair of images shows color-coded maps from NASA's Dawn mission, revealing the highs and lows of topography on the surface of dwarf planet Ceres.

    The map at left is centered on terrain at 60 degrees east longitude; the map at right is centered on 240 degrees east longitude.

    The color scale extends about 5 miles (7.5 kilometers) below the surface in indigo to 5 miles (7.5 kilometers) above the surface in white.

    The topographic map was constructed from analyzing images from Dawn's framing camera taken from varying sun and viewing angles. The map was combined with an image mosaic of Ceres and projected as an orthographic projection.

    The well-known bright spots in the center of Ceres northern hemisphere in the image at right retain their bright appearance, although they are color-coded in the same green elevation of the crater floor in which they sit.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

    Read more

  • Ceres, auffälliger Berg in Schrägansicht

    Ceres, auffälliger Berg in Schrägansicht

    Among the highest features seen on Ceres so far is a mountain about 4 miles (6 kilometers) high, which is roughly the elevation of Mount McKinley in Alaska's Denali National Park.

    This image comes from an animation, shown in PIA19619, generated using data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Vertical relief has been exaggerated by a factor of five. Exaggerating the relief helps scientists understand and visualize the topography much more easily, and highlights features that are sometimes subtle.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

    Read more

  • Ceres, Teil der südlichen Hemisphäre

    Ceres, Teil der südlichen Hemisphäre

    This image, taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, shows a portion of the southern hemisphere of dwarf planet Ceres from an altitude of 915 miles (1,470 kilometers). The image was taken on Sept. 20, 2015, and has a resolution of 450 feet (140 meters) per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

  • Ceres, Krater Occator in Falschfarben, Mosaik

    Ceres, Krater Occator in Falschfarben, Mosaik

    This representation of Ceres' Occator Crater in false colors shows differences in the surface composition. Red corresponds to a wavelength range around 0.97 micrometers (near infrared), green to a wavelength range around 0.75 micrometers (red, visible light) and blue to a wavelength range of around 0.44 micrometers (blue, visible light). Occator measures about 60 miles (90 kilometers) wide.

    Scientists use false color to examine differences in surface materials. The color blue on Ceres is generally associated with bright material, found in more than 130 locations, and seems to be consistent with salts, such as sulfates. It is likely that silicate materials are also present.

    The images were obtained by the framing camera on NASA's Dawn spacecraft from a distance of about 2,700 miles (4,400 kilometers).

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

    Read more

  • Ceres, globale Ansicht mit Krater Occator in Falschfarben

    Ceres, globale Ansicht mit Krater Occator in Falschfarben

    Dwarf planet Ceres is shown in these false-color renderings, which highlight differences in surface materials. Images from NASA's Dawn spacecraft were used to create a movie of Ceres rotating, followed by a flyover view of Occator Crater, home of Ceres' brightest area.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

    Read more

  • Ceres, Blick auf den Rand mit Krater Rao im Vordergrund

    Ceres, Blick auf den Rand mit Krater Rao im Vordergrund

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft looked northward toward the limb of Ceres to capture this scene, with Rao Crater (7 miles, 12 kilometers) at bottom.

    Dawn took this image on May 30, 2016, from its low-altitude mapping orbit, at a distance of about 240 miles (385 kilometers) above the surface. The image resolution is 120 feet (35 meters) per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

    Read more

  • Ceres, Schrägansicht von Ahuna Mons

    Ceres, Schrägansicht von Ahuna Mons

    Ceres' lonely mountain, Ahuna Mons, is seen in this simulated perspective view. The elevation has been exaggerated by a factor of two. The view was made using enhanced-color images from NASA's Dawn mission.

    Images taken using blue (440 nanometers), green (750 nanometers) and infrared (960 nanometers) spectral filters were combined to create the view.

    The spacecraft's framing camera took the images from Dawn's low-altitude mapping orbit, from an altitude of 240 miles (385 kilometers) in August 2016. The resolution of the component images is 120 feet (35 meters) per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

    Read more

  • Ceres, Krater Haulani mit Rutschungen am Kraterrand und zentraler Erhebung

    Ceres, Krater Haulani mit Rutschungen am Kraterrand und zentraler Erhebung

    Ceres' Haulani Crater, with a diameter of 21 miles (34 kilometers), shows evidence of landslides from its crater rim. Smooth material and a central ridge stand out on its floor. This image was made using data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft when it was in its high-altitude mapping orbit, at a distance of 915 miles (1,470 kilometers) from Ceres.

    This enhanced color view allows scientists to gain insight into materials and how they relate to surface morphology. Rays of bluish ejected material are prominent in this image. The color blue in such views has been associated with young features on Ceres.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

    Read more

  • Ceres, Detailansicht des hellen Materials von Cerealia Facula im Inneren des Kraters Occator

    Ceres, Detailansicht des hellen Materials von Cerealia Facula im Inneren des Kraters Occator

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft captured pictures in visible and infrared wavelengths, which were combined to create this false-color view of a region in 57-mile-wide (92-kilometer-wide) Occator Crater on the dwarf planet Ceres (in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter). Here, recently exposed brine, or salty liquids, in the center of the crater were pushed up from a deep reservoir below Ceres' crust. In this view, they appear reddish.

    In the foreground, is Cerealia Facula ("facula" means bright area), a 9-mile-wide (15-kilometer-wide) region with a composition dominated by salts. The central dome, Cerealia Tholus, is about 1.9 miles (3 kilometers) across at its base and 1,100 feet (340 meters) tall. The dome is inside a central depression about 3,000 feet (900 meters) deep.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

    Read more

  • Pluto, globales Mosaik aus 4 Aufnahmen in Farbe aus 450.000 km Entfernung

    Pluto, globales Mosaik aus 4 Aufnahmen in Farbe aus 450.000 km Entfernung

    Four images from NASA's New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were combined with color data from the Ralph instrument to create this global view of Pluto. (The lower right edge of Pluto in this view currently lacks high-resolution color coverage.) The images, taken when the spacecraft was 280,000 miles (450,000 kilometers) away, show features as small as 1.4 miles (2.2 kilometers), twice the resolution of the single-image view taken on July 13, 2015.

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

    Read more

  • Pluto, Blick auf die Äquatorregion von Cthulhu Regio bis Sputnik Planum

    Pluto, Blick auf die Äquatorregion von Cthulhu Regio bis Sputnik Planum

    This synthetic perspective view of Pluto, based on the latest high-resolution images to be downlinked from NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, shows what you would see if you were approximately 1,100 miles (1,800 kilometers) above Pluto's equatorial area, looking northeast over the dark, cratered, informally named Cthulhu Regio toward the bright, smooth, expanse of icy plains informally called Sputnik Planum. The entire expanse of terrain seen in this image is 1,100 miles (1,800 kilometers) across. The images were taken as New Horizons flew past Pluto on July 14, 2015, from a distance of 50,000 miles (80,000 kilometers).

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

    Read more

  • Pluto, majestätische Berge, Eisebenen und mehrere Dunstschichten

    Pluto, majestätische Berge, Eisebenen und mehrere Dunstschichten

    Just 15 minutes after its closest approach to Pluto on July 14, 2015, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft looked back toward the sun and captured a near-sunset view of the rugged, icy mountains and flat ice plains extending to Pluto's horizon. The smooth expanse of the informally named Sputnik Planum (right) is flanked to the west (left) by rugged mountains up to 11,000 feet (3,500 meters) high, including the informally named Norgay Montes in the foreground and Hillary Montes on the skyline. The backlighting highlights more than a dozen layers of haze in Pluto's tenuous but distended atmosphere. The image was taken from a distance of 11,000 miles (18,000 kilometers) to Pluto; the scene is 230 miles (380 kilometers) across.

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

    Read more

  • Pluto, globale farbverstärkte Ansicht mit Sputnik Planum

    Pluto, globale farbverstärkte Ansicht mit Sputnik Planum

    NASA's New Horizons spacecraft captured this high-resolution enhanced color view of Pluto on July 14, 2015. The image combines blue, red and infrared images taken by the Ralph/Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC). Pluto's surface sports a remarkable range of subtle colors, enhanced in this view to a rainbow of pale blues, yellows, oranges, and deep reds. Many landforms have their own distinct colors, telling a complex geological and climatological story that scientists have only just begun to decode. The image resolves details and colors on scales as small as 0.8 miles (1.3 kilometers).

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

    Read more

  • Pluto, Mosaik der Oberfläche in hoher Auflösung von Kratern und Bergen bis zur Ebene von Sputnik Planum

    Pluto, Mosaik der Oberfläche in hoher Auflösung von Kratern und Bergen bis zur Ebene von Sputnik Planum

    High-resolution images of Pluto taken by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft just before closest approach on July 14, 2015, reveal features as small as 270 yards (250 meters) across, from craters to faulted mountain blocks, to the textured surface of the vast basin informally called Sputnik Planum. Enhanced color has been added from the global color image. This image is about 330 miles (530 kilometers) across.

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

    Read more

  • Plutomond Charon, hochaufgelöstes Mosaik und globaler Kontext

    Plutomond Charon, hochaufgelöstes Mosaik und globaler Kontext

    High-resolution images of Charon were taken by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, shortly before closest approach on July 14, 2015, and overlaid with enhanced color from the Ralph/Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC). Charon's cratered uplands at the top are broken by series of canyons, and replaced on the bottom by the rolling plains of the informally named Vulcan Planum. The scene covers Charon's width of 754 miles (1,214 kilometers) and resolves details as small as 0.5 miles (0.8 kilometers).

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

    Read more

  • Plutomond Charon, globale farbverstärkte Ansicht in hoher Auflösung

    Plutomond Charon, globale farbverstärkte Ansicht in hoher Auflösung

    NASA's New Horizons captured this high-resolution enhanced color view of Charon just before closest approach on July 14, 2015. The image combines blue, red and infrared images taken by the spacecraft's Ralph/Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC); the colors are processed to best highlight the variation of surface properties across Charon. Charon's color palette is not as diverse as Pluto's; most striking is the reddish north (top) polar region, informally named Mordor Macula. Charon is 754 miles (1,214 kilometers) across; this image resolves details as small as 1.8 miles (2.9 kilometers).

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

    Read more

  • Pluto, Sputnik Planum, farbverstärkte Ansicht

    Pluto, Sputnik Planum, farbverstärkte Ansicht

    This high-resolution image captured by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft combines blue, red and infrared images taken by the Ralph/Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC). The bright expanse is the western lobe of the "heart," informally called Sputnik Planum, which has been found to be rich in nitrogen, carbon monoxide and methane ices.

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

    Read more

  • Pluto, Detail der al-Idrisi Berge am Rand von Sputnik Planum

    Pluto, Detail der al-Idrisi Berge am Rand von Sputnik Planum

    In this highest-resolution image from NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, great blocks of Pluto's water-ice crust appear jammed together in the informally named al-Idrisi mountains. Some mountain sides appear coated in dark material, while other sides are bright. Several sheer faces appear to show crustal layering, perhaps related to the layers seen in some of Pluto's crater walls. Other materials appear crushed between the mountains, as if these great blocks of water ice, some standing as much as 1.5 miles high, were jostled back and forth. The mountains end abruptly at the shoreline of the informally named Sputnik Planum, where the soft, nitrogen-rich ices of the plain form a nearly level surface, broken only by the fine trace work of striking, cellular boundaries and the textured surface of the plain's ices (which is possibly related to sunlight-driven ice sublimation). This view is about 50 miles wide. The top of the image is to Pluto's northwest.

    These images were made with the telescopic Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) aboard New Horizons, in a timespan of about a minute centered on 11:36 UT on July 14 -- just about 15 minutes before New Horizons' closest approach to Pluto -- from a range of just 10,000 miles (17,000 kilometers). They were obtained with an unusual observing mode; instead of working in the usual "point and shoot," LORRI snapped pictures every three seconds while the Ralph/Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC) aboard New Horizons was scanning the surface. This mode requires unusually short exposures to avoid blurring the images.

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

    Read more

  • Plutomond Nix, Aufnahme aus 23.000 km Entfernung

    Plutomond Nix, Aufnahme aus 23.000 km Entfernung

    This recently received panchromatic image of Pluto's small satellite Nix taken by the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) aboard New Horizons is one of the best images of Pluto's third-largest moon generated by the NASA mission. Taken on July 14, 2015, at a range of about 14,000 miles (23,000 kilometers) from Nix, the illuminated surface is about 12 miles (19 kilometers) by 29 miles (47 kilometers). The unique perspective of this image provides new details about Nix's geologic history and impact record.

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

    Read more

  • Pluto im Gegenlicht mit erkennbaren Dunstschichten in annähernd Echtfarbe

    Pluto im Gegenlicht mit erkennbaren Dunstschichten in annähernd Echtfarbe

    This processed image is the highest-resolution color look yet at the haze layers in Pluto's atmosphere. Shown in approximate true color, the picture was constructed from a mosaic of four panchromatic images from the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) splashed with Ralph/Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) four-color filter data, all acquired by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft on July 14, 2015. The resolution is 1 kilometer (0.6 miles) per pixel; the sun illuminates the scene from the right.

    Scientists believe the haze is a photochemical smog resulting from the action of sunlight on methane and other molecules in Pluto's atmosphere, producing a complex mixture of hydrocarbons such as acetylene and ethylene. These hydrocarbons accumulate into small particles, a fraction of a micrometer in size, and scatter sunlight to make the bright blue haze seen in this image.

    As they settle down through the atmosphere, the haze particles form numerous intricate, horizontal layers, some extending for hundreds of miles around Pluto. The haze layers extend to altitudes of over 200 kilometers (120 miles).

    Adding to the stark beauty of this image are mountains on Pluto's limb (on the right, near the 4 o'clock position), surface features just within the limb to the right, and crepuscular rays (dark finger-like shadows to the left) extending from Pluto's topographic features.

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

    Read more

  • Charon, Überflug über die Oberfläche, Einzelbild aus Movie

    Charon, Überflug über die Oberfläche, Einzelbild aus Movie

    In July 2015, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft sent home the first close-up pictures of Pluto and its moons. Using actual New Horizons data and digital elevation models of Pluto and its largest moon, Charon, mission scientists created flyover movies that offer spectacular new perspectives of the many unusual features that were discovered and which have reshaped our views of the Pluto system -- from a vantage point even closer than a ride on New Horizons itself.

    The flight over Charon begins high over the hemisphere New Horizons saw on its closest approach, then descends over the deep, wide canyon of Serenity Chasma. The view moves north, passing over Dorothy Gale crater and the dark polar hood of Mordor Macula. The flight then turns back south, covering the northern terrain of Oz Terra before ending over the relatively flat equatorial plains of Vulcan Planum and the "moated mountains" of Clarke Montes. (Note that all feature names are informal.)

    The topographic relief is exaggerated by a factor of 2 to 3 in these movies to emphasize topography; the surface colors have also been enhanced to bring out detail. Digital mapping and rendering were performed by Paul Schenk and John Blackwell of the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston.

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Lunar and Planetary Institute

    Read more