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Zusammenstellung ausgewählter Bilder zu den Saturnmonden, die um weiterführenden Links mit der Möglichkeit des Downloads ergänzt wurden.

  • Drei globale Ansichten Titans von verschiedenen Vorbeiflüge im Infrarot

    Drei globale Ansichten Titans von verschiedenen Vorbeiflüge im Infrarot

    The three mosaics shown here were composed with data from Cassini's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer taken during the last three Titan flybys, on Oct. 28, 2005 (left image), Dec. 26, 2005 (middle image), and Jan. 15, 2006 (right image).

    These false-color images were constructed from images taken at the following wavelengths: 1.6 microns (blue), 2.01 (green), and 5 microns (red).

    The viewing geometry of the December flyby is roughly on Titan's opposite hemisphere from the flybys in October and January. There are several important features to note in the images. The first is that the south polar cloud system was very bright during the December flyby, while during the October and January flybys, it is barely visible, indicating that the atmosphere over Titan's south pole is very dynamic.

    In the December (middle) mosaic, a north polar hood that is bright at 5 microns is visible. Its composition is unknown. The north polar hood is barely seen in the October (left image) and January (right image) data. Visible in the October and December images just south of the equator is Tui Reggio, a region nicknamed the "chevron." This region is very bright at 5 microns and is among the brightest features on Titan at that wavelength. Tui Reggio is thought to be a surface deposit, probably of volcanic origin, and may be water and/or carbon dioxide frozen from the vapor. The December flyby data show that the western margins of Tui Reggio have a complex flow-like character consistent with eruptive phenomena.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

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  • Titan, hoher Dunst und feine Wolkenstrukturen über dem nördlichen Terminator

    Titan, hoher Dunst und feine Wolkenstrukturen über dem nördlichen Terminator

    A global detached haze layer and discrete cloud-like features high above Titan's northern terminator (day-night transition) are visible in this close-up image acquired on October 24, 2004, as the Cassini spacecraft neared its first close encounter with Titan. This image is a colorized version of an ultraviolet image released on October 25, 2004. The haze has been given colors that are close to what the natural colors are believed to be. The view was also sharpened to enhance the structure in the discrete features.

    The image was acquired at a distance of about 1 million kilometers in a near ultraviolet filter that is sensitive to scattering by small particles. The Sun preferentially illuminates the southern hemisphere at this time; the north polar region is in darkness. The well-known global detached haze layer, hundreds of kilometers above Titan's surface, is produced by photochemical reactions and is visible as a thin ring of bright material around the entire planet. At the northern high-latitude edge of the image, additional striations are visible, caused by particulates that are high enough to be illuminated by the Sun even though the surface directly below is in darkness. These striations may simply be caused by a wave propagating through the detached haze, or they may be evidence of additional regional haze or cloud layers not present at other latitudes.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Prometheus und Saturns F-Ring in hoher Auflösung aus 782.000 km Entfernung

    Prometheus und Saturns F-Ring in hoher Auflösung aus 782.000 km Entfernung

    As it completed its first orbit of Saturn, Cassini zoomed in on the rings to catch this wondrous view of the shepherd moon Prometheus (102 kilometers across) working its influence on the multi-stranded and kinked F ring.

    The F ring resolves into five separate strands in this closeup view. Potato-shaped Prometheus is seen here, connected to the ringlets by a faint strand of material. Imaging scientists are not sure exactly how Prometheus is interacting with the F ring here, but they have speculated that the moon might be gravitationally pulling material away from the ring. The ringlets are disturbed in several other places. In some, discontinuities or "kinks" in the ringlets are seen; in others, gaps in the diffuse inner strands are seen. All these features appear to be due to the influence of Prometheus.

    The image was taken in visible light with the narrow angle camera on Oct. 29, 2004, at a distance of about 782,000 kilometers from Prometheus and at a Sun-Prometheus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 147 degrees. The image scale is 4.7 kilometers per pixel. The image has been magnified by a factor of two, and contrast was enhanced, to aid visibility.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Titan, Rand des Mondes und obere Atmosphäre mit verschiedenen Dunstschichten im Ultraviolett

    Titan, Rand des Mondes und obere Atmosphäre mit verschiedenen Dunstschichten im Ultraviolett

    Cassini has found Titan's upper atmosphere to consist of a surprising number of layers of haze, as shown in this ultraviolet image of Titan's night side limb, colorized to look like true color. The many fine haze layers extend several hundred kilometers above the surface. Although this is a night side view, with only a thin crescent receiving direct sunlight, the haze layers are bright from light scattered through the atmosphere.

    The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow angle camera. About 12 distinct haze layers can be seen in this image, with a scale of 0.7 kilometers per pixel. The limb shown here is at about 10 degrees south latitude, in the equatorial region.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Iapetus, hochauflösende Detailaufnahme eines gigantischen Erdrutsches in der Cassini Regio

    Iapetus, hochauflösende Detailaufnahme eines gigantischen Erdrutsches in der Cassini Regio

    A spectacular landslide within the low-brightness region of Iapetus's surface known as Cassini Regio is visible in this image from Cassini. Iapetus is one of the moons of Saturn.

    The landslide material appears to have collapsed from a scarp 15 kilometers high (9 miles) that forms the rim of an ancient 600 kilometer impact basin. Unconsolidated rubble from the landslide extends halfway across a conspicuous, 120-kilometer diameter flat-floored impact crater that lies just inside the basin scarp.

    Landslides are common geological phenomena on many planetary bodies, including Earth and Mars. The appearance of this landslide on an icy satellite with low-brightness cratered terrain is reminiscent of landslide features that were observed during NASA's Galileo mission on the Jovian satellite Callisto. The fact that the Iapetus landslide traveled many kilometers from the basin scarp could indicate that the surface material is very fine-grained, and perhaps was fluffed by mechanical forces that allowed the landslide debris to flow extended distances.

    In this view, north is to the left of the picture and solar illumination is from the bottom of the frame. The image was obtained in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow angle camera on Dec. 31, 2004, at a distance of about 123,400 kilometers from Iapetus and at a Sun-Iapetus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 78 degrees. Resolution achieved in the original image was 740 meters per pixel. The image has been contrast-enhanced and magnified by a factor of two to aid visibility.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

  • Titan, drei globale Ansichten: Echtfarbenkomposit, im nahen Infrarot und Falschfarbenkomposit

    Titan, drei globale Ansichten: Echtfarbenkomposit, im nahen Infrarot und Falschfarbenkomposit

    These three views of Titan from the Cassini spacecraft illustrate how different the same place can look in different wavelengths of light. Cassini's cameras have numerous filters that reveal features above and beneath the shroud of Titan's atmosphere.

    The first image, a natural color composite, is a combination of images taken through three filters that are sensitive to red, green and violet light. It shows approximately what Titan would look like to the human eye: a hazy orange globe surrounded by a tenuous, bluish haze. The orange color is due to the hydrocarbon particles which make up Titan's atmospheric haze. This obscuring haze was particularly frustrating for planetary scientists following the NASA Voyager mission encounters in 1980-81. Fortunately, Cassini is able to pierce Titan's veil at infrared wavelengths.

    The second, monochrome view shows what Titan looks like at 938 nanometers, a near-infrared wavelength that allows Cassini to see through the hazy atmosphere and down to the surface. The view was created by combining three separate images taken with this filter, in order to improve the visibility of surface features. The variations in brightness on the surface are real differences in the reflectivity of the materials on Titan.

    The third view, which is a false-color composite, was created by combining two infrared images (taken at 938 and 889 nanometers) with a visible light image (taken at 420 nanometers). Green represents areas where Cassini is able to see down to the surface. Red represents areas high in Titan's stratosphere where atmospheric methane is absorbing sunlight. Blue along the moon's outer edge represents visible violet wavelengths at which the upper atmosphere and detached hazes are better seen.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Prometheus, Pandora und F-Ring aus 483.500 km bzw. 459.000 km Entfernung

    Prometheus, Pandora und F-Ring aus 483.500 km bzw. 459.000 km Entfernung

    This spectacular image shows Prometheus (at right) and Pandora (at left), with their flock of icy ring particles (the F ring) between them. Pandora is exterior to the ring, and closer to the spacecraft here. Each of the shepherd satellites has an unusual shape, with a few craters clearly visible.

    The effect of Prometheus (102 kilometers across) on the F ring is visible as it pulls material out of the ring when it is farthest from Saturn in its orbit. Pandora is 84 kilometers across.

    The image was taken in polarized green light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Oct. 29, 2005, at a distance of approximately 459,000 kilometers from Pandora and 483,500 kilometers from Prometheus. The image scale is 3 kilometers per pixel on Pandora and 3 kilometers per pixel on Prometheus. The view was acquired from about a third of a degree below the ringplane.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Tethys, großes Einschlagbecken Odysseus mit mehreren kleinen Kratern im Inneren

    Tethys, großes Einschlagbecken Odysseus mit mehreren kleinen Kratern im Inneren

    Plunging cliffs and towering mountains characterize the gigantic impact structure called Odysseus on Saturn's moon Tethys. The great impact basin lies before the Cassini spacecraft in one of the best views yet obtained.

    Quite a few small craters are visible inside Odysseus (450 kilometers across), making it clear that this is not a very young structure. However, a comparison of cratering density between the interior of Odysseus and the surrounding terrain should show whether the large basin is at least relatively young.

    Odysseus is on the leading hemisphere of Tethys (1,071 kilometers across). North is up and rotated 18 degrees to the right.

    The image was taken in polarized ultraviolet light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Dec. 24, 2005 at a distance of approximately 196,000 kilometers from Tethys and at a Sun-Tethys-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 85 degrees. Resolution in the original image was 1 kilometer per pixel. The image has been magnified by a factor of two and contrast-enhanced to aid visibility.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Hyperion, hochauflösende globale Ansicht aus 33.000 km Entfernung

    Hyperion, hochauflösende globale Ansicht aus 33.000 km Entfernung

    Saturn's impact-pummeled moon Hyperion stares back at the Cassini spacecraft in this six-image mosaic, taken during the spacecraft's close approach on Sept. 26, 2005.

    This up-close view shows a low-density body blasted by impacts over eons. Scientists believe that the spongy appearance of Hyperion is caused by a phenomenon called thermal erosion, in which dark materials accumulating on crater floors are warmed by sunlight and melt deeper into the surface, allowing surrounding ice to vaporize away. At 280 kilometers, across, Hyperion's impact-shaped morphology makes it the largest known irregularly-shaped moon in the solar system.

    Six, clear-filter images were combined to create this mosaic. Images were taken by the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera at a mean distance of about 33,000 kilometers from Hyperion and at a Sun-Hyperion-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 51 degrees. Image scale is 197 meters per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Mimas vor Saturn, globale Ansicht mit erkennbaren Strukturen im Ultraviolett

    Mimas vor Saturn, globale Ansicht mit erkennbaren Strukturen im Ultraviolett

    This amazing perspective view captures battered Mimas against the hazy limb of Saturn.

    It is obvious in such close-up images that Mimas (397 kilometers across) has been badly scarred by impacts over the eons. Its 130 kilometer-wide crater, Herschel, lies in the darkness at right.

    North on Mimas is up and rotated 19 degrees to the right.

    The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on March 21, 2006 using a filter sensitive to wavelengths of ultraviolet light centered at 338 nanometers. The image was acquired at a distance of approximately 191,000 kilometers from Mimas and at a Sun-Mimas-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 91 degrees. Image scale is 1 kilometer per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Iapetus, Detail des Übergangs zwischen heller und dunkler Hemisphäre

    Iapetus, Detail des Übergangs zwischen heller und dunkler Hemisphäre

    Dark material splatters the walls and floors of craters in the surreal, frozen wastelands of Iapetus. This image shows terrain in the transition region between the moon's dark leading hemisphere and its bright trailing hemisphere. The view was acquired during Cassini's only close flyby of the two-toned Saturn moon.

    The image was taken on Sept. 10, 2007, with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera at a distance of approximately 6,030 kilometers from Iapetus. Image scale is 36 meters per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Iapetus, hochauflösende globale Ansicht der hellen Hemisphäre

    Iapetus, hochauflösende globale Ansicht der hellen Hemisphäre

    Cassini captures the first high-resolution glimpse of the bright trailing hemisphere of Saturn's moon Iapetus.

    This false-color mosaic shows the entire hemisphere of Iapetus (1,468 kilometers across) visible from Cassini on the outbound leg of its encounter with the two-toned moon in Sept. 2007. The central longitude of the trailing hemisphere is 24 degrees to the left of the mosaic's center.

    Also shown here is the complicated transition region between the dark leading and bright trailing hemispheres. This region, visible along the right side of the image, was observed in many of the images acquired by Cassini near closest approach during the encounter.

    The most prominent topographic feature in this view, in the bottom half of the mosaic, is a 450-kilometer wide impact basin, one of at least nine such large basins on Iapetus. In fact, the basin overlaps an older, similar-sized impact basin to its southeast.

    The view was acquired with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Sept. 10, 2007, at a distance of about 73,000 kilometers from Iapetus.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Epimetheus, globale Ansicht der südlichen Hemisphäre

    Epimetheus, globale Ansicht der südlichen Hemisphäre

    The Cassini spacecraft's close flyby of Epimetheus in December 2007 returned detailed images of the moon's south polar region.

    The view shows what might be the remains of a large impact crater covering most of this face, and which could be responsible for the somewhat flattened shape of the southern part of Epimetheus (116 kilometers across) seen previously at much lower resolution.

    The image also shows two terrain types: darker, smoother areas, and brighter, slightly more yellowish, fractured terrain. One interpretation of this image is that the darker material evidently moves down slopes, and probably has a lower ice content than the brighter material, which appears more like "bedrock." Nonetheless, materials in both terrains are likely to be rich in water ice.

    The images that were used to create this enhanced color view were taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Dec. 3, 2007. The views were obtained at a distance of approximately 37,400 kilometers from Epimetheus and at a Sun-Epimetheus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 65 degrees. Image scale is 224 meters per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Rhea, globale Ansicht vor Saturn mit Ringsystem in Kantenstellung

    Rhea, globale Ansicht vor Saturn mit Ringsystem in Kantenstellung

    The Cassini spacecraft looks toward Rhea's cratered, icy landscape with the dark line of Saturn's ringplane and the planet's murky atmosphere as a background.

    Rhea is Saturn's second-largest moon, at 1,528 kilometers across.

    This view looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings from less than a degree above the ringplane.

    Images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters were combined to create this natural color view. The images were acquired with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 17, 2007 at a distance of approximately 1.2 million kilometers from Rhea. Image scale is 7 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Enceladus, Damascus Sulcus im Südpolgebiet

    Enceladus, Damascus Sulcus im Südpolgebiet

    This image is the seventh skeet-shoot image taken during Cassini's very close flyby of Enceladus on Aug. 11, 2008. Damascus Sulcus is crossing the upper part of the image. (The image is upside down from the skeet-shoot footprint shown here.) The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Aug. 11, 2008, a distance of approximately 4,742 kilometers above the surface of Enceladus. Image scale is approximately 30 meters per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Enceladus, halbglobale Ansicht der südlichen Hemisphäre

    Enceladus, halbglobale Ansicht der südlichen Hemisphäre

    On Oct. 5, 2008, just after coming within 25 kilometers of the surface of Enceladus, NASA's Cassini captured this stunning mosaic as the spacecraft sped away from this geologically active moon of Saturn.

    Craters and cratered terrains are rare in this view of the southern region of the moon's Saturn-facing hemisphere. Instead, the surface is replete with fractures, folds, and ridges—all hallmarks of remarkable tectonic activity for a relatively small world. In this enhanced-color view, regions that appear blue-green are thought to be coated with larger grains than those that appear white or gray.

    Portions of the tiger stripe fractures, or sulci, are visible along the terminator at lower right, surrounded by a circumpolar belt of mountains. The icy moon's famed jets emanate from at least eight distinct source regions, which lie on or near the tiger stripes. However, in this view, the most prominent feature is Labtayt Sulci, the approximately one-kilometer deep northward-trending chasm located just above the center of the mosaic.

    Near the top, the conspicuous ridges are Ebony and Cufa Dorsae. This mosaic is an orthographic projection centered at 64.49 degrees south latitude, 283.87 west longitude, and it has an image scale of 196 kilometers per pixel. The original images ranged in resolution from 180 meters to 288 meters per pixel and were acquired at distances ranging from 30,000 to 48,000 kilometers as the spacecraft receded from Enceladus. The view was acquired at a Sun-Enceladus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 73 degrees.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Titan als Sichel mit erkennbarer globaler hoher Dunstschicht im Ultraviolett

    Titan als Sichel mit erkennbarer globaler hoher Dunstschicht im Ultraviolett

    Saturn's moon Titan displays a detached, high-altitude global haze layer which is often its most prominent feature in ultraviolet views such as this one.

    In this image, Cassini looks down on the north pole of Titan, and, although this view is centered on the leading hemisphere of the moon, the lit terrain seen here is mostly on the opposite, trailing hemisphere of the moon.

    The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 19, 2009 using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of ultraviolet light centered at 338 nanometers. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.3 million kilometers from Titan and at a Sun-Titan-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 141 degrees. Image scale is 8 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Enceladus, Ansicht der Südpolregion als Sichel mit erkennbaren Jets

    Enceladus, Ansicht der Südpolregion als Sichel mit erkennbaren Jets

    Dramatic plumes, both large and small, spray water ice and vapor from many locations along the famed "tiger stripes" near the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The tiger stripes are four prominent, approximately 135-kilometer-long fractures that cross the moon's south polar terrain.

    This two-image mosaic is one of the highest resolution views acquired by Cassini during its imaging survey of the geyser basin capping the southern hemisphere of Saturn's moon Enceladus. It clearly shows the curvilinear arrangement of geysers, erupting from the fractures. From left to right, the fractures are Alexandria, Cairo, Baghdad, and Damascus.

    As a result of this survey, 101 geysers were discovered: 100 have been located on one of the tiger stripes, and the three-dimensional configurations of 98 of these geysers have also been determined. The source location of the remaining geyser could not be definitively established. These results, together with those of other Cassini instruments, now strongly suggest that the geysers have their origins in the sea known to exist beneath the ice underlying the south polar terrain.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Iapetus, zwei Ansichten, die die extremen Helligkeitsunterschiede aufzeigen

    Iapetus, zwei Ansichten, die die extremen Helligkeitsunterschiede aufzeigen

    These two global images of Iapetus show the extreme brightness dichotomy on the surface of this peculiar Saturnian moon. The left-hand panel shows the moon's leading hemisphere and the right-hand panel shows the moon's trailing side. While low and mid latitudes of the leading side exhibit a surface almost as dark as charcoal, broad tracts of the trailing side are almost as bright as snow. The dark terrain covers about 40 percent of the surface and is named Cassini Regio. The names of the bright terrain are Roncevaux Terra (north) and Saragossa Terra (south).

    On both hemispheres, the dominant landforms are impact craters. The largest known well-preserved basin on Iapetus, called Turgis, has a diameter of about 580 kilometers. It lies at 17 degrees north latitude, 28 degrees west longitude at the eastern edge of the dark Cassini Regio and is visible on the right side of the left-hand panel. The prominent basin on the southern trailing side (at the lower left of the right-hand panel) is Engelier. Engelier is located at 41 degrees south latitude, 265 degrees west longitude, and has a diameter of about 504 kilometers. Its formation destroyed about half of Gerin, another large basin on Iapetus. Gerin is located at 46 degrees south latitude, 233 degrees west longitude, and has a diameter of about 445 kilometers. Tortelosa Montes, a part of the giant equatorial ridge that was discovered in Cassini images on December 25, 2004, is visible in the left panel as a thin line within Cassini Regio, and as a tall prominence at the western limb. It continues onto the trailing side (right side of right panel), where the bright western flanks of the Carcassone Montes appear as dominant bright spots within the western edge of Cassini Regio.

    North on Iapetus is approximately up in the images. Iapetus has a diameter of 1471 kilometers. The right-hand panel shows a mosaic of 60 different images, obtained on September 10, 2007. The left-hand panel is a color composite of three images obtained through infrared, green and ultraviolet spectral filters (centered at 752, 568 and 338 nanometers, respectively) by Cassini's narrow-angle camera on Dec. 27, 2004. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 717,000 kilometers from Iapetus and at a sun-Iapetus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 22 degrees.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturnmond Mimas mit Krater Herschel

    Saturnmond Mimas mit Krater Herschel

    Relatively dark regions below bright crater walls and streaks on some of the walls are seen in this mosaic of Saturn's moon Mimas, created from images taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during its closest flyby of the moon. The crater floors and surroundings are about 20 percent darker than the steep crater walls in this view.

    Mimas' original surface, like the surfaces of most of the other major Saturnian moons without atmospheres, is not pure ice but contains some dark impurities.

    Cassini came within about 9,500 kilometers of Mimas during its flyby on Feb. 13, 2010. This mosaic was created from seven images taken that day in visible light with Cassini's narrow-angle camera. An eighth, lower-resolution image from the same flyby, taken with the wide-angle camera, was used to fill in the right of the mosaic. The images were re-projected into an orthographic map projection. This view looks toward the hemisphere of Mimas that leads in its orbit around Saturn. Mimas is 396 kilometers across. The mosaic is centered on terrain at 5 degrees south latitude, 85 degrees west longitude. North is up.

    This view was acquired at a distance of approximately 16,000 kilometers from Mimas and at a Sun-Mimas-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 46 degrees. Image scale is 90 meters per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Krater Herschel auf Mimas

    Krater Herschel auf Mimas

    Subtle color differences on Saturn's moon Mimas are apparent in this false-color view of Herschel Crater captured by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during its closest-ever flyby of that moon.

    The image shows terrain-dependent color variations, particularly the contrast between the bluish materials in and around Herschel Crater (130 kilometers wide) and the greenish cast on older, more heavily cratered terrain elsewhere. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood, but may be caused by subtle differences in the surface composition between the two terrains.

    Herschel Crater covers most of the bottom of this image. To create this false-color view, ultraviolet, green and infrared images were combined into a single picture that exaggerates the color differences of terrain on the moon. These data were combined with a high-resolution image taken in visible light to provide the high-resolution information from the clear-filter image and the color information from the ultraviolet, green and infrared filter images. The natural color of Mimas visible to the human eye may be a uniform gray or yellow color, but this mosaic has been contrast-enhanced and shows differences at other wavelengths of light.

    The images were obtained with Cassini's narrow-angle camera on that day at a distance of approximately 16,000 kilometers from Mimas. The images were re-projected into an orthographic map projection. A black and white image, taken in visible light with the wide-angle camera, is used to fill in parts of the mosaic. Image scale is 90 meters per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Prometheus, hochauflösende globale Ansicht teilweise im Saturnschein

    Prometheus, hochauflösende globale Ansicht teilweise im Saturnschein

    Appearing like eyes on a potato, craters cover the dimly lit surface of the moon Prometheus in this high-resolution image from the Cassini spacecraft's early 2010 flyby.

    The Jan. 27 encounter represented the closest imaging sequence yet of that moon for Cassini. This view looks toward the trailing hemisphere of Prometheus (86 kilometers across). North on Prometheus is up and rotated 8 degrees to the right.

    The moon is lit by sunlight on the right and Saturnshine on the left.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Jan. 27, 2010. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 34,000 kilometers from Prometheus and at a Sun-Prometheus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 126 degrees. Image scale is 200 meters per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Calypso, hochauflösende globale Ansicht

    Calypso, hochauflösende globale Ansicht

    The Cassini spacecraft's February 2010 encounter with Calypso yielded this incredibly detailed view of this Trojan moon.

    Irregularly shaped Calypso is one of two Trojan moons of the larger moon Tethys; Calypso trails Tethys in its orbit by 60 degrees. Like Telesto, Calypso's smooth surface does not appear to retain the record of intense cratering that most of Saturn's other moons possess.

    This view looks toward the leading hemisphere of Calypso (21 kilometers across). North on Calypso is up and rotated 1 degree to the left. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Feb. 13, 2010. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 21,000 kilometers from Calypso and at a Sun-Calypso-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 75 degrees. Scale in the original image was 128 meters per pixel. The image has been magnified by a factor of two and contrast-enhanced to aid visibility.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturnmond Rhea aus 30.000 km Entfernung

    Saturnmond Rhea aus 30.000 km Entfernung

    The Cassini spacecraft looks toward the cratered plains of the trailing hemisphere of Rhea.

    Some of the moon's fractures, appearing like wispy bright lines, can be seen on the left of the image. Rhea's north pole is up and rotated 3 degrees to the right. The moon is 1,528 kilometers across.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Nov. 21, 2009. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 30,000 kilometers from Rhea and at a Sun-Rhea-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 27 degrees. Image scale is 2 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Dione über dem Ringsystem in nahezu Kantenstellung unter Rheas Südpol

    Dione über dem Ringsystem in nahezu Kantenstellung unter Rheas Südpol

    The Cassini spacecraft looks past the cratered south polar area of Saturn's moon Rhea to spy the moon Dione and the planet's rings in the distance.

    Dione's "wispy" terrain can be seen on the trailing hemisphere of that moon.

    This view looks toward the south polar area of the anti-Saturn side of Rhea (1,528 kilometers across) and the Saturn-facing side of Dione (1,123 kilometers across). North on the moons is up.

    This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ringplane. The rings, closer to Cassini than Dione is, obscure the view of the south of Dione.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Jan. 11, 2011. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 61,000 kilometers from Rhea and at a Sun-Rhea-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 15 degrees. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 924,000 kilometers from Dione and at a Sun-Dione-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 15 degrees. Image scale is 358 meters per pixel on Rhea and 6 kilometers per pixel on Dione.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Rhea, Enceladus und Dione mit Ringsystem

    Rhea, Enceladus und Dione mit Ringsystem

    The Cassini spacecraft observes three of Saturn's moons set against the darkened night side of the planet.

    Saturn is present on the left this image but is too dark to see. Rhea (1,528 kilometers across) is closest to Cassini here and appears largest at the center of the image. Enceladus (504 kilometers across) is to the right of Rhea. Dione (1,123 kilometers across) is to the left of Rhea, partly obscured by Saturn.

    This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ringplane.

    The image was taken in visible red light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 25, 2011. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 2.2 million kilometers from Rhea and at a Sun-Rhea-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 67 degrees. Image scale is 13 kilometers per pixel on Rhea. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 3 million kilometers from Enceladus and at a phase angle of 67 degrees. Image scale is 18 kilometers per pixel on Enceladus. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 3.1 million kilometers from Dione and at a phase angle of 67 degrees. Image scale is 19 kilometers per pixel on Dione.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Helene aus 7.000 km Entfernung

    Helene aus 7.000 km Entfernung

    The Cassini spacecraft snapped this image of Saturn's moon Helene while completing the mission's second-closest encounter of the moon on June 18, 2011.

    Although Cassini's closest flyby of Helene was in March 2010, this June 2011 flyby yielded some of the highest resolution images of the moon.

    Lit terrain seen here is on the leading hemisphere of Helene (33 kilometers across). North on Helene is up.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 7,000 kilometers) from Helene and at a Sun-Helene-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 104 degrees. Image scale is 42 meters per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Titan vor Dione und Saturns Äquatorregion mit Ringsystem

    Titan vor Dione und Saturns Äquatorregion mit Ringsystem

    Saturn's fourth-largest moon, Dione, can be seen through the haze of the planet's largest moon, Titan, in this view of the two posing before the planet and its rings from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

    This view looks toward the sides of Titan (5,150 kilometers across) and Dione (1,123 kilometers across) facing away from Saturn. North is up on the moons. This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ring plane.

    Images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters were combined to create this natural color view. The images were obtained with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on May 21, 2011, at a distance of approximately 2.3 million kilometers from Titan and 3.2 million kilometers from Dione. Image scale is 14 kilometers per pixel on Titan and 19 kilometers on Dione.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Titan, Ligeia Mare in Falschfarben in der Nordpolregion

    Titan, Ligeia Mare in Falschfarben in der Nordpolregion

    Ligeia Mare, shown here in a false-color image from NASA's Cassini mission, is the second largest known body of liquid on Saturn's moon Titan. It is filled with liquid hydrocarbons, such as ethane and methane, and is one of the many seas and lakes that bejewel Titan's north polar region. Cassini has yet to observe waves on Ligeia Mare and will look again during its next encounter on May 23, 2013.

    The image is a false-color mosaic of synthetic aperture radar images obtained by the Cassini spacecraft between February 2006 and April 2007. Dark areas (low radar return) are colored black while bright regions (high radar return) are colored yellow to white. In this color scheme, liquids, which are dark to the radar, end up appearing black and the solid surface of Titan, which appears bright to the radar, ends up appearing yellow.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI/Cornell

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  • Südpolare Jets am Enceladus

    Südpolare Jets am Enceladus

    Tiny water ice particles make up the bulk of the plume as imaged by Cassini's cameras. These particles tend to scatter light toward the viewer much more at higher phase angles than lower ones. Imaging scientists process such images to remove variations in brightness due to the changing phase angle in order to study the plume's true variation in brightness. Observing how the brightness of the plume varies throughout the icy moon's orbit can help scientists understand the nature of the mechanisms that force material to Enceladus' surface.

    These views look toward the leading hemisphere of Enceladus. North on the icy moon is up. The images were taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on May 10, 2015. The views were acquired at distance of approximately 350,000 kilometers from Enceladus. Image scale is about 2 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Janus über den F-Ring aus 87.000 km Entfernung

    Janus über den F-Ring aus 87.000 km Entfernung

    Janus (179 kilometers across) seems to almost stare off into the distance, contemplating deep, moonish thoughts as the F ring stands by at the bottom of this image.

    From this image, it is easy to distinguish Janus' shape from that of a sphere. Many of Saturn's smaller moons have similarly irregular shapes that scientists believe may give clues to their origins and internal structure. Models combining the dynamics of this moon with its shape imply the existence of mass inhomogeneities within Janus. This would be a surprising result for a body the size of Janus. By studying more images of Janus, scientists may be able confirm this finding and determine just how complicated the internal structure of this small body is.

    This image is roughly centered on the side of Janus which faces away from Saturn. North on Janus is up and rotated 3 degrees to the right. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on March 28, 2012.

    The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 87,000 kilometers from Janus. Image scale is 520 meters per pixel.

    Bild: https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18299

  • Rhea, Detail der Oberfläche nahe des Terminators

    Rhea, Detail der Oberfläche nahe des Terminators

    Surface features on Rhea -- mostly impact craters in this image -- are thrown into sharp relief thanks to long shadows. Viewing this terrain near the day/night terminator makes it easier to appreciate just how violent Rhea's geological history has been.

    The craters on Rhea (1,527 kilometers across) are the result of 4.6 billion years of bombardment by small bodies. With very little erosion, the scars and craters remain unless they are overwritten by other, newer impacts.

    This view looks toward the anti-Saturn hemisphere of Rhea. North on Rhea is up and rotated 11 degrees to the right. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Feb. 10, 2015.

    The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 76,000 kilometers from Rhea. Image scale is 460 meters per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Bruchstrukturen auf Diones Oberfläche aus 110.000 km Entfernung

    Bruchstrukturen auf Diones Oberfläche aus 110.000 km Entfernung

    While not bursting with activity like its sister satellite Enceladus, the surface of Dione is definitely not boring. Some parts of the surface are covered by linear features, called chasmata, which provide dramatic contrast to the round impact craters that typically cover moons.

    The bright network of fractures on Dione (1123 kilometers across) was seen originally at poor resolution in Voyager images and was labeled as "wispy terrain." The nature of this terrain was unclear until Cassini showed that they weren't surface deposits of frost, as some had suspected, but rather a pattern of bright icy cliffs among myriad fractures. One possibility is that this stress pattern may be related to Dione's orbital evolution and the effect of tidal stresses over time.

    This view looks toward the trailing hemisphere of Dione. North on Dione is up. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 11, 2015.

    The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 110,000 kilometers from Dione. Image scale is 660 meters per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Tethys und Rhea im sichtbaren roten Licht

    Tethys und Rhea im sichtbaren roten Licht

    Similar in many ways, Saturn's moons Tethys and Rhea (left and right, respectively) even share a discoverer: Giovanni Cassini, namesake of the NASA spacecraft that captured this view.

    The moons are named for sisters -- two Titans of Greek mythology. Although somewhat different in size, Rhea (1,527 kilometers across) and Tethys (1,062 kilometers across) are medium-sized moons that are large enough to have pulled themselves into round shapes. They are both composed largely of ices and are generally thought to be geologically inactive today.

    The view looks toward the anti-Saturn sides of Tethys and Rhea. North on both moons is up. The image was taken in visible red light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Oct. 11, 2015.

    The two moons appear close together here, but Tethys was about 360,000 kilometers farther away from Cassini when the image was captured -- nearly the distance from Earth to our moon. Thus, the view does not accurately reflect the bodies' relative sizes.

    The image was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.14 million kilometers from Rhea. Image scale on Rhea is 7 kilometers per pixel. Tethys was 1.5 million kilometers away during this observation and has a pixel scale of 9 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Phoebe, zwei Ansichten vor und nach dem Vorbeiflug 2004

    Phoebe, zwei Ansichten vor und nach dem Vorbeiflug 2004

    As it entered the Saturn system, NASA's Cassini spacecraft performed its first targeted flyby of one of the planet's moons. On June 11, 2004, Cassini passed Phoebe, the largest of Saturn's outer or "irregular" moons, at an altitude of just 2,068 kilometers. This was the sole close flyby of one of the outer moons of Saturn in the entire Cassini mission.

    The image on the left side shows Cassini's view on approach to Phoebe, while the right side shows the spacecraft's departing perspective. Most of the left-side view was previously released; an area on its upper right side is newly filled in here. Most of the view on the right side has not previously been released.

    Phoebe's shape is approximately spherical, with a diameter of 219 kilometers on its longest axis and 204 kilometers on its shortest axis, which is also the rotation axis. This is approximately 16 times smaller than Earth's moon.

    The image mosaic on the left, recorded about 45 minutes before closest approach to Phoebe, is composed of six frames from Cassini's Narrow-Angle Camera (NAC), plus one Wide-Angle Camera (WAC) image to fill the gap on the upper-right limb. The image has a spatial resolution of 80 meters per pixel. The sun-Phoebe-spacecraft, or phase, angle is 80 degrees. The image at right, taken about half an hour after closest approach, is composed of eight NAC frames. The spatial resolution is 65 meters per pixel, and the phase angle is 83 degrees.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Tethys, globale hochaufgelöste Ansicht, farbverstärkt

    Tethys, globale hochaufgelöste Ansicht, farbverstärkt

    This enhanced-color mosaic of Saturn's icy moon Tethys shows a range of features on the moon's trailing hemisphere. Tethys is tidally locked to Saturn, so the trailing hemisphere is the side of the moon that always faces opposite its direction of motion as it orbits the planet. Images taken using clear, green, infrared and ultraviolet spectral filters were combined to create the view, which highlights subtle color differences across Tethys' surface at wavelengths not visible to human eyes. The moon's surface is fairly uniform in natural color.

    The color of the surface changes conspicuously across the disk, from yellowish hues to nearly white. These broad color changes are affected by a number of external processes. First, Saturn's diffuse E-ring preferentially bombards Tethys' leading hemisphere, toward the right side of this image, with ice bright ice grains. At the same time, charged particles from Saturn's radiation belt bombard the surface on the trailing side, causing color changes due to chemical alteration of the materials there. The albedo -- a measure of the surface's reflectivity -- drops by 10 to 15 percent from the moon's leading side to the trailing side. Similar global color patterns exist on other Saturnian moons.

    This mosaic is an orthographic projection constructed from 52 Cassini images obtained on April 11, 2015 with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera. Resolution is about 300 meters per pixel. The images were obtained at a distance of approximately 53,000 kilometers from Tethys.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Dione, globales Mosaik mit Saturn im Hintergrund

    Dione, globales Mosaik mit Saturn im Hintergrund

    This view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft looks toward Saturn's icy moon Dione, with giant Saturn and its rings in the background, just prior to the mission's final close approach to the moon on August 17, 2015.

    At lower right is the large, multi-ringed impact basin named Evander, which is about 350 kilometers wide. The canyons of Padua Chasma, features that form part of Dione's bright, wispy terrain, reach into the darkness at left.

    Imaging scientists combined nine visible light (clear spectral filter) images to create this mosaic view: eight from the narrow-angle camera and one from the wide-angle camera, which fills in an area at lower left. The scene is an orthographic projection centered on terrain at 0.2 degrees north latitude, 179 degrees west longitude on Dione. North on Dione is up.

    The view was acquired at distances ranging from approximately 170,000 kilometers to 63,000 kilometers from Dione and at a sun-Dione-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 35 degrees. Image scale is about 450 meters per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Enceladus, Schrägansicht der Nordpolregion mit Brüchen

    Enceladus, Schrägansicht der Nordpolregion mit Brüchen

    NASA's Cassini spacecraft zoomed by Saturn's icy moon Enceladus on Oct. 14, 2015, capturing this stunning image of the moon's north pole.

    Scientists expected the north polar region of Enceladus to be heavily cratered, based on low-resolution images from the Voyager mission, but high-resolution Cassini images show a landscape of stark contrasts. Thin cracks cross over the pole -- the northernmost extent of a global system of such fractures. Before this Cassini flyby, scientists did not know if the fractures extended so far north on Enceladus.

    North on Enceladus is up. The image was taken in visible green light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera.

    The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 6,000 kilometers from Enceladus and at a Sun-Enceladus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 9 degrees. Image scale is 35 meters per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Daphnis in der Keeler-Lücke mit vom Mond erzeugten Wellen

    Daphnis in der Keeler-Lücke mit vom Mond erzeugten Wellen

    The wavemaker moon, Daphnis, is featured in this view, taken as NASA's Cassini spacecraft made one of its ring-grazing passes over the outer edges of Saturn's rings on Jan. 16, 2017. This is the closest view of the small moon obtained yet.

    Daphnis ( 8 kilometers across) orbits within the 42-kilometer wide Keeler Gap. Cassini's viewing angle causes the gap to appear narrower than it actually is, due to foreshortening. The little moon's gravity raises waves in the edges of the gap in both the horizontal and vertical directions. Cassini was able to observe the vertical structures in 2009, around the time of Saturn's equinox.

    Like a couple of Saturn's other small ring moons, Atlas and Pan, Daphnis appears to have a narrow ridge around its equator and a fairly smooth mantle of material on its surface -- likely an accumulation of fine particles from the rings. A few craters are obvious at this resolution. An additional ridge can be seen further north that runs parallel to the equatorial band.

    The image was taken in visible (green) light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 28,000 kilometers from Daphnis and at a Sun-Daphnis-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 71 degrees. Image scale is 168 meters per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Titan, globale Ansicht mit Tethys in Echtfarbe

    Titan, globale Ansicht mit Tethys in Echtfarbe

    Saturn's moon Tethys disappears behind Titan as observed by Cassini on Nov. 26, 2009. Tethys is about 1,070 kilometers across. At about 5,100 kilometers wide, Titan is larger than the planet Mercury, and was much closer to Cassini than Tethys at the time of this image. Titan is planet-like in another way: it's wrapped in a thick atmosphere, which can be clearly seen here where it overlaps icy Tethys in the distance beyond.

    Cassini captured this natural-color image at a distance of approximately 1 million kilometers from Titan.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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