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Zusammenstellung ausgewählter Bilder zu Jupiter und seinen Monden, die um weiterführenden Links mit der Möglichkeit des Downloads ergänzt wurden.

  • Jupiter, globale Ansicht mit erkennbaren Strukturen in der Atmosphäre

    Jupiter, globale Ansicht mit erkennbaren Strukturen in der Atmosphäre

    Hubble’s September 4th photo of Jupiter displays the ever-changing landscape of its turbulent atmosphere, where several new storms are making their mark, and the pace of color changes near the planet’s equator is continuing to surprise researchers.

    The planet’s equatorial zone has remained a deep orange hue for a much longer time, compared to previous darkening episodes. While the equator has changed from its traditional white or beige appearance for a few years now, scientists were surprised to find the deeper orange color to persist in Hubble’s recent imaging, instead expecting the zone to lose its reddish haze layer.

    Just above the equator, researchers note the appearance of several new storms, nicknamed “barges” during the Voyager era. These elongated red cells can be defined as cyclonic vortexes, which vary in appearance. While some of the storms are sharply defined and clear, others are fuzzy and hazy. This difference in appearance is caused by the properties within the clouds of the vortexes.

    Bild:
    Science: NASA, ESA, Amy Simon (NASA-GSFC), Michael H. Wong (UC Berkeley)
    Image processing: Joseph DePasquale (STScI)

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  • Jupiter mit Großem Roten Fleck und Mond Ganymed

    Jupiter mit Großem Roten Fleck und Mond Ganymed

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has caught Jupiter's moon Ganymede playing a game of "peek-a-boo." In this crisp Hubble image, Ganymede is shown just before it ducks behind the giant planet.

    Ganymede completes an orbit around Jupiter every seven days. Because Ganymede's orbit is tilted nearly edge-on to Earth, it routinely can be seen passing in front of and disappearing behind its giant host, only to reemerge later. Composed of rock and ice, Ganymede is the largest moon in our solar system. It is even larger than the planet Mercury. But Ganymede looks like a dirty snowball next to Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system. Jupiter is so big that only part of its Southern Hemisphere can be seen in this image.

    The image also shows Jupiter's Great Red Spot, the large eye-shaped feature at upper left. A storm the size of two Earths, the Great Red Spot has been raging for more than 300 years. Hubble's sharp view of the gas giant planet also reveals the texture of the clouds in the Jovian atmosphere as well as various other storms and vortices.

    This color image was made from three images taken on April 9, 2007, with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 in red, green, and blue filters. The image shows Jupiter and Ganymede in close to natural colors.

    Bild: NASA, ESA, and E. Karkoschka (University of Arizona)

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  • Jupiter, Teil der südlichen Hemisphäre mit dem Großen Roten Fleck

    Jupiter, Teil der südlichen Hemisphäre mit dem Großen Roten Fleck

    This dramatic view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and its surroundings was obtained by Voyager 1 on Feb. 25, 1979, when the spacecraft was 5.7 million miles (9.2 million kilometers) from Jupiter. Cloud details as small as 100 miles (160 kilometers) across can be seen here. The colorful, wavy cloud pattern to the left of the Red Spot is a region of extraordinarily complex end variable wave motion. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Voyager mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Jupiter mit Großem Roten Fleck

    Jupiter mit Großem Roten Fleck

    This processed color image of Jupiter was produced in 1990 by the U.S. Geological Survey from a Voyager image captured in 1979. The colors have been enhanced to bring out detail. Zones of light-colored, ascending clouds alternate with bands of dark, descending clouds. The clouds travel around the planet in alternating eastward and westward belts at speeds of up to 540 kilometers per hour. Tremendous storms as big as Earthly continents surge around the planet. The Great Red Spot (oval shape toward the lower-left) is an enormous anticyclonic storm that drifts along its belt, eventually circling the entire planet.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/USGS

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  • Hauptringsystem des Jupiters m Bereich des sichtbaren Lichts

    Hauptringsystem des Jupiters m Bereich des sichtbaren Lichts

    The ring system of Jupiter was imaged by the Galileo spacecraft on November 9, 1996. In this image the west ansa of Jupiter's main ring is seen at a resolution of 24 kilometers per pixel. The ring clearly shows radial structure that had only been hinted at in the Voyager images. The plot of the brightness of ring as a function of location, going from the inner-most edge of the image to the outer-most through the thickest part of the ring, shows the "dips" in brightness due to perturbations from satellites. Two small satellites, Adrastea and Metis, which are not seen in this image, orbit through the outer portion of the ansa; their location relative to these radial features will be available after further data analysis. The ring's faint halo is seen to arise in the inner main ring just as it fades. Although most of Jupiter's ring is composed of small grains that should be highly perturbed by the strong Jovian magnetosphere, the ring's brightness drops abruptly at the outer edge.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Jupiter, Detail der nördlichen Hemisphäre in Falschfarben

    Jupiter, Detail der nördlichen Hemisphäre in Falschfarben

    Mosaic of Jupiter's northern hemisphere between 10 and 50 degrees latitude. Jupiter's atmospheric circulation is dominated by alternating eastward and westward jets from equatorial to polar latitudes. The direction and speed of these jets in part determine the color and texture of the clouds seen in this mosaic. Also visible are several other common Jovian cloud features, including large white ovals, bright spots, dark spots, interacting vortices, and turbulent chaotic systems. The north-south dimension of each of the two interacting vortices in the upper half of the mosaic is about 3500 kilometers.

    This mosaic uses the Galileo imaging camera's three near-infrared wavelengths (756 nanometers, 727 nanometers, and 889 nanometers displayed in red, green, and blue) to show variations in cloud height and thickness. Light blue clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are deep, and white clouds are high and thick. The clouds and haze over the ovals are high, extending into Jupiter's stratosphere. Dark purple most likely represents a high haze overlying a clear deep atmosphere. Galileo is the first spacecraft to distinguish cloud layers on Jupiter.

    North is at the top. The images are projected on a sphere, with features being foreshortened towards the north. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on April 3, 1997, at a range of 1.4 million kilometers by the Solid State Imaging system (CCD) on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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  • Jupiter, äquatorialer Hot Spot in Echt- und Falschfarben

    Jupiter, äquatorialer Hot Spot in Echt- und Falschfarben

    True and false color views of an equatorial "hotspot" on Jupiter. These images cover an area 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers. The top mosaic combines the violet (410 nanometers or nm) and near-infrared continuum (756 nm) filter images to create an image similar to how Jupiter would appear to human eyes. Differences in coloration are due to the composition and abundances of trace chemicals in Jupiter's atmosphere. The bottom mosaic uses Galileo's three near-infrared wavelengths (756 nm, 727 nm, and 889 nm displayed in red, green, and blue) to show variations in cloud height and thickness. Bluish clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are low, and white clouds are high and thick. The dark blue hotspot in the center is a hole in the deep cloud with an overlying thin haze. The light blue region to the left is covered by a very high haze layer. The multicolored region to the right has overlapping cloud layers of different heights. Galileo is the first spacecraft to distinguish cloud layers on Jupiter.

    North is at the top. The mosaics cover latitudes 1 to 10 degrees and are centered at longitude 336 degrees West. The planetary limb runs along the right edge of the image. Cloud patterns appear foreshortened as they approach the limb. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers by the Solid State Imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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  • Jupiter, Detail der Atmosphäre, Voyager 1

    Jupiter, Detail der Atmosphäre, Voyager 1

    This view of Jupiter was taken by Voyager 1. This image was taken through color filters and recombined to produce the color image. This photo was assembled from three black and white negatives by the Image Processing Lab at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Jupiters dünnes Ringsystem im Gegenlicht

    Jupiters dünnes Ringsystem im Gegenlicht

    Jupiter's faint ring system is shown in this color composite as two light orange lines protruding from the left toward Jupiter's limb. This picture was taken in Jupiter's shadow through orange and violet filters. The colorful images of Jupiter's bright limb are evidence of the spacecraft motion during these long exposures. The Voyager 2 spacecraft was at a range of 1,450,000 kilometers about two degrees below the plane of the ring. The lower ring image was cut short by Jupiter's shadow on the ring.

    JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Jupiters Ringsystem im Gegenlicht

    Jupiters Ringsystem im Gegenlicht

    Dieses Bildmosaik von Jupiters Ringsystem wurde von der NASA-Raumsonde Galileo aufgenommen, als sich die Sonne genau hinter dem Planeten befand, das Raumschiff durch den von Jupiter verursachten Sonnenschatten flog und dabei rückwärts in Richtung des Planeten blickte. Bei einer derartigen Konfiguration werden sehr kleine, staubkorngroße Partikel vom Sonnenlicht stark betont, so daß sowohl die Partikel des Ringsystems, als auch sehr kleine Bestandteile der obersten Jupiteratmosphäre sichtbar werden. Man nimmt von diesen winzigen Partikeln an, daß ihre Lebensdauer etwa der eines Menschenlebens entspricht, also relativ kurz ist im Vergleich zum Alter des Sonnensystems, das etwa viereinhalb Milliarden Jahre beträgt.

    Jupiters Ringsystem besteht aus drei Teilen: Einem flachen Hauptring, einer torusförmigen Halo im Inneren des Hauptrings, und dem sog. "Gossamer-Ring", der sich außerhalb des Hauptrings befindet. In diesem Mosaik sind nur der Hauptring und andeutungsweise die ihn umgebende Halo zu erkennen.

    Die Aufnahmen zur Montage dieses Mosaiks wurden durch den "Clear-Filter" des digitalen Kamerasystems am 9. November 1996 aufgenommen, als Galileo seine dritte Jupiterumrundung vornahm. Die Entfernung zum Ring betrug etwa 2,3 Millionen Kilometer. Die Bildauflösung beträgt entlang einer von links nach rechts gedachten Linie etwa 46 km pro Bildpunkt. Da sich die Raumsonde allerdings nur 0,5 Grad über der Ringebene befand, erscheint das Bild in seiner Tiefenwirkung erheblich "gestaucht". Die hellen, vertikalen Bögen in der Bildmitte stellen die von der Sonne durchdrungenen obersten Schichten der Jupiteratmosphäre dar, also gewissermaßen den Rand der Planetenscheibe, und stammen von zwei Aufnahmen der NASA-Sonde Voyager aus dem Jahre 1979.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Cornell University

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  • Jupiters Hauptring und Halo

    Jupiters Hauptring und Halo

    The top and bottom panels show a mosaic of images of Jupiter's rings taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. Jupiter is to the right of this mosaic, and different brightness scales accent different parts of the ring system. Jupiter's ring system has three parts -- a flat main ring; a halo inside the main ring shaped like a double-convex lens; and the gossamer ring outside the main ring. In the top view, a faint mist of particles is seen above and below the main ring. This vertically extended "halo" is unusual in planetary rings, and is caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains, which carry electric charges, out of the ring plane.

    Jupiter's main ring is a thin sheet of material encircling the planet. The near and far arms of this ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, the portion visible on the sides of Jupiter, on the figure's far left side. In the bottom view, some radial structure is visible across the ring's ansa. The diffuse innermost boundary begins at approximately 122,500 kilometers. The main ring's outer radius is at about 128,940 kilometers, very close to the orbit of the Jovian moon Adrastea (128,980 kilometers). The brightness of the main ring drops markedly at about 127,850 kilometers, very near the orbit of another moon, Metis, at 127,978 kilometers. Jupiter's four small satellites, Metis, Adrastea, Amalthea and Thebe, affect the structure of the huge planet's tenuous rings.

    These images were taken through the clear filter of Galileo's onboard solid state imaging camera system on November 9, 1996. The resolution is approximately 24 kilometers (14 miles) per picture element along Jupiter's rings.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Cornell University

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  • Aufbau des Ringsystems und die kleinen inneren Monde

    Aufbau des Ringsystems und die kleinen inneren Monde

    This schematic cut-away view of the components of Jupiter's ring system shows the geometry of the rings in relation to Jupiter and to the small inner satellites, which are the source of the dust which forms the rings.

    The innermost and thickest ring, shown in gray shading, is the halo that ends at the main ring. The thin, narrow main ring, shown with red shading, is bounded by the 16- kilometer-wide satellite Adrastea and shows a marked decrease in brightness near the orbit of Jupiter's innermost moon, Metis. It is composed of fine particles knocked off Adrastea and Metis. Although the orbits of Adrastea and Metis are about 1,000 kilometers apart, that separation is not depicted in this drawing. Impacts by small meteoroids (fragments of asteroids and comets) into these small, low-gravity satellites feed material into the rings. Thebe and Amalthea, the next two satellites in increasing distance from Jupiter, supply dust which forms the thicker, disk-like "gossamer" rings. The gossamer rings, depicted with yellow and green shading, are thicker because the source satellites orbit Jupiter on inclined paths .

    These small satellites all orbit closer to Jupiter than the four largest Galilean satellites, Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto, which were discovered nearly 400 years ago. The orbital distances of the moons are drawn relative to the size of Jupiter.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Cornell University

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  • Jupiter und Ganymed

    Jupiter und Ganymed

    The solar system's largest moon, Ganymede, is captured here alongside the planet Jupiter in a color picture taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft on Dec. 3, 2000.

    Ganymede is larger than the planets Mercury and Pluto and Saturn's largest moon, Titan. Both Ganymede and Titan have greater surface area than the entire Eurasian continent on our planet. Cassini was 26.5 million kilometers from Ganymede when this image was taken. The smallest visible features are about 160 kilometers across.

    The bright area near the south (bottom) of Ganymede is Osiris, a large, relatively new crater surrounded by bright icy material ejected by the impact, which created it. Elsewhere, Ganymede displays dark terrains that NASA's Voyager and Galileo spacecraft have shown to be old and heavily cratered. The brighter terrains are younger and laced by grooves. Various kinds of grooved terrains have been seen on many icy moons in the solar system. These are believed to be the surface expressions of warm, pristine, water-rich materials that moved to the surface and froze.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

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  • Ansicht des Jupiters in hoher Auflösung und simulierter Echtfarbe

    Ansicht des Jupiters in hoher Auflösung und simulierter Echtfarbe

    Diese simulierte Echtfarbenansicht von Jupiter besteht aus Aufnahmen der Sonde Cassini, die am 7. Dezember 2000 gewonnen wurden. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt waren bereits vier Aufnahmen nötig, um den gesamten Planeten abbilden zu können. Die Bilder wurden zu einem Mosaik zusammengesetzt und zunächst in einer zylindrischen Kartenprojektion zusammengefügt. Diese Karte wurde dann auf eine abgeplattete Kugel projiziert, um zu verdeutlichen, wie Jupiter aussehen würde, wenn das Blickfeld der Kamera groß genug gewesen wäre, um den gesamten Planeten zu erfassen. Die Auflösung beträgt 144 Kilometer pro Bildpunkt.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

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  • Echtfarbenmosaik von Jupiter

    Echtfarbenmosaik von Jupiter

    This true color mosaic of Jupiter was constructed from images taken by the narrow angle camera onboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft on December 29, 2000, during its closest approach to the giant planet at a distance of approximately 10 million kilometers.

    It is the most detailed global color portrait of Jupiter ever produced; the smallest visible features are approximately 60 kilometers across. The mosaic is composed of 27 images: nine images were required to cover the entire planet in a tic-tac-toe pattern, and each of those locations was imaged in red, green, and blue to provide true color. Although Cassini's camera can see more colors than humans can, Jupiter's colors in this new view look very close to the way the human eye would see them.

    Everything visible on the planet is a cloud. The parallel reddish-brown and white bands, the white ovals, and the large Great Red Spot persist over many years despite the intense turbulence visible in the atmosphere. The most energetic features are the small, bright clouds to the left of the Great Red Spot and in similar locations in the northern half of the planet. These clouds grow and disappear over a few days and generate lightning. Streaks form as clouds are sheared apart by Jupiter's intense jet streams that run parallel to the colored bands. The prominent dark band in the northern half of the planet is the location of Jupiter's fastest jet stream, with eastward winds of 480 kilometers per hour. Jupiter's diameter is eleven times that of Earth, so the smallest storms on this mosaic are comparable in size to the largest hurricanes on Earth.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Globale Ansicht der Jupiteratmosphäre in zylindrischer Projektion

    Globale Ansicht der Jupiteratmosphäre in zylindrischer Projektion

    This map is part of a group release of cylindrical and polar stereographic projections of Jupiter. These color maps of Jupiter were constructed from images taken by the narrow-angle camera onboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft on Dec. 11 and 12, 2000, as the spacecraft neared Jupiter during its flyby of the giant planet. Cassini was on its way to Saturn. They are the most detailed global color maps of Jupiter ever produced. The smallest visible features are about 120 kilometers across.

    The maps are composed of 36 images: a pair of images covering Jupiter's northern and southern hemispheres was acquired in two colors every hour for nine hours as Jupiter rotated beneath the spacecraft. Although the raw images are in just two colors, 750 nanometers (near-infrared) and 451 nanometers (blue), the map's colors are close to those the human eye would see when gazing at Jupiter.

    The maps show a variety of colorful cloud features, including parallel reddish-brown and white bands, the Great Red Spot, multi-lobed chaotic regions, white ovals and many small vortices. Many clouds appear in streaks and waves due to continual stretching and folding by Jupiter's winds and turbulence. The bluish-gray features along the north edge of the central bright band are equatorial "hot spots," meteorological systems such as the one entered by NASA's Galileo probe. Small bright spots within the orange band north of the equator are lightning-bearing thunderstorms. The polar regions are less clearly visible because Cassini viewed them at an angle and through thicker atmospheric haze.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Zwei Aufnahmen des feinen Ringsystems vor und nach der größten Annäherung von New Horizons

    Zwei Aufnahmen des feinen Ringsystems vor und nach der größten Annäherung von New Horizons

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a "low" sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small "shepherding" moons.

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

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  • Jupiter im Infrarot und Mond Io, Montage

    Jupiter im Infrarot und Mond Io, Montage

    This is a montage of New Horizons images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io, taken during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby in early 2007. The Jupiter image is an infrared color composite taken by the spacecraft's near-infrared imaging spectrometer, the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) at 1:40 UT on Feb. 28, 2007. The infrared wavelengths used (red: 1.59 µm, green: 1.94 µm, blue: 1.85 µm) highlight variations in the altitude of the Jovian cloud tops, with blue denoting high-altitude clouds and hazes, and red indicating deeper clouds. The prominent bluish-white oval is the Great Red Spot. The observation was made at a solar phase angle of 75 degrees but has been projected onto a crescent to remove distortion caused by Jupiter's rotation during the scan. The Io image, taken at 00:25 UT on March 1st 2007, is an approximately true-color composite taken by the panchromatic Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), with color information provided by the 0.5 µm ("blue") and 0.9 µm ("methane") channels of the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC). The image shows a major eruption in progress on Io's night side, at the northern volcano Tvashtar. Incandescent lava glows red beneath a 330-kilometer high volcanic plume, whose uppermost portions are illuminated by sunlight. The plume appears blue due to scattering of light by small particles in the plume

    Bild: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Goddard Space Flight Center

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  • Jupiter, Sequenz aus elf farbverstärkten Aufnahmen

    Jupiter, Sequenz aus elf farbverstärkten Aufnahmen

    This sequence of color-enhanced images shows how quickly the viewing geometry changes for NASA's Juno spacecraft as it swoops by Jupiter. The images were obtained by JunoCam.

    Once every 53 days, Juno swings close to Jupiter, speeding over its clouds. In just two hours, the spacecraft travels from a perch over Jupiter's north pole through its closest approach (perijove), then passes over the south pole on its way back out. This sequence shows 11 color-enhanced images from Perijove 8 (Sept. 1, 2017) with the south pole on the left (11th image in the sequence) and the north pole on the right (first image in the sequence).

    The first image on the right shows a half-lit globe of Jupiter, with the north pole approximately at the upper center of the image close to the terminator -- the dividing line between night and day. As the spacecraft gets closer to Jupiter, the horizon moves in and the range of visible latitudes shrinks. The second and third images in this sequence show the north polar region rotating away from the spacecraft's field of view while the first of Jupiter's lighter-colored bands comes into view. The fourth through the eighth images display a blue-colored vortex in the mid-southern latitudes. Additionally, a darker, dynamic band can be seen just south of the vortex. In the ninth and tenth images, the south polar region rotates into view. The final image on the left displays Jupiter's south pole in the center.

    Bild: Enhanced image by Kevin M. Gill (CC-BY) based on images provided courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

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  • Wolkenwirbel in der nördlichen Hemisphäre Jupiters

    Wolkenwirbel in der nördlichen Hemisphäre Jupiters

    Intricate swirls in Jupiter's volatile northern hemisphere are captured in this color-enhanced image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. Bursts of bright-white "pop-up" clouds appear scattered throughout the scene, with some visibly casting shadows on the neighboring cloud layers beneath them. Juno scientists are using shadows to determine the distances between cloud layers in Jupiter's atmosphere, which provide clues to their composition and origin.

    This image was taken at 10:27 p.m. PDT on May 23, 2018 (1:27 a.m. EDT on May 24) as the spacecraft performed its 13th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time, Juno was about 11,350 kilometers from the planet's cloud tops, above a northern latitude of approximately 49 degrees.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstad/Sean Doran

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  • Blick auf Jupiters Südpol und die südliche Hemisphäre

    Blick auf Jupiters Südpol und die südliche Hemisphäre

    Just after its close flyby of Jupiter on Nov. 3, 2019, NASA's Juno spacecraft caught this striking view of Jupiter's southern hemisphere as the spacecraft sped away from the giant planet. This image captures massive cyclones near Jupiter's south pole, as well as the chaotic clouds of the folded filamentary region — the turbulent area between the orange band and the brownish polar region.

    When this image was taken, Juno was traveling at about 137,000 kilometers per hour relative to the planet. A little more than an hour earlier — at the point of closest approach to the cloud tops — the spacecraft reached speeds relative to Jupiter in excess of 209,000 kilometers per hour.

    Citizen scientist Ali Abbasi created this image using data from the spacecraft's JunoCam imager. It was taken on Nov. 3, 2019, at 3:29 p.m. PST (6:29 p.m. EST) as Juno performed its 23rd close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 104,600 kilometers from the planet at a latitude of about -70 degrees.

    Bild:
    Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
    Image processing by AliAbbasiPov, © CC BY

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  • Jupiter, Großer Roter Fleck aus 70.000 km Entfernung

    Jupiter, Großer Roter Fleck aus 70.000 km Entfernung

    Swirling in Jupiter's atmosphere for hundreds of years, the Great Red Spot is captured in this pair of close-up images from Juno's JunoCam camera. The giant storm churns through Jupiter's atmosphere, creating the turbulent flows to its west. On the west side of the Great Red Spot itself a sliver of red material is being pulled off the periphery. This is a recent, frequent, phenomenon first observed in ground-based data in 2017.

    Two images have been mosaicked together by citizen scientist Kevin M. Gill to create this enhanced color composite. When they were taken on Feb. 12, 2019 at 10:24 a.m. PDT (1:24 p.m. EDT) and 10:29 a.m. PDT (1:29 p.m. EDT), Juno was about 70,000 kilometers above Jupiter's cloud tops. Features as small as 50 kilometers can be resolved in the images, allowing us to see structure in the interior of the Great Red Spot, as well as the fine texture of the white clouds in the South Tropical Zone below.

    Bild:
    Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
    Image processing by Kevin M. Gill, © CC BY

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  • Jupiters Südpol mit neuem Zyklon

    Jupiters Südpol mit neuem Zyklon

    A series of JunoCam images from Juno's 23rd close pass by Jupiter (Perijove 23) on Nov. 3, 2019 has revealed a sixth circumpolar cyclone in the cluster around Jupiter's south pole. A single cyclone is located close to the geographic south pole, and until now it has been surrounded by five cyclones. The five cyclones were discovered in images acquired early in the Juno mission, but their positioning was never a perfect pentagon. There was always a gap between cyclones 1 and 2 that varied in extent. Now number six has drifted into that gap, forming a nearly-perfect pentagon. The new cyclone had been observed previously nearby.

    Close examination at high resolution reveals cyclonic motion in the dark center. The dark core is (1,400 kilometers across), with the bright outer ring at 2,000 kilometers)in diameter.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

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  • Detail der Wolkendecke mit komplexer Topographie in den nördlichen mittleren Breiten Jupiters

    Detail der Wolkendecke mit komplexer Topographie in den nördlichen mittleren Breiten Jupiters

    This detailed, color-enhanced JunoCam image by NASA's Juno spacecraft reveals a complex topography in the cloud tops of Jupiter's northern mid-latitude region. Small, bright "pop-up" clouds in the center of the image rise above the surrounding features, standing out at the tops and edges of the swirling patterns; the darker areas nearby reveal greater depth. Clouds like these are thought to be the tops of the violent thunderstorms at the heart of the "shallow lighting" — high-altitude electrical storms originating where it is too cold for liquid-water clouds to exist — recently discovered by the Juno mission.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill © CC BY

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  • Jupiters Nordpolregion im Detail

    Jupiters Nordpolregion im Detail

    This image of Jupiter's norther polar region was processed by citizen scientist Emma Wälimäki. The data for the image was collected during Juno's 29th perijove (PJ) pass on Sept. 16, 2020.

    Bild:
    Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
    Image processing: Emma Wälimäki © CC BY

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  • Detail eines Sturms in der nördlichen gemäßigten Zone Jupiters

    Detail eines Sturms in der nördlichen gemäßigten Zone Jupiters

    Jupiter's zonal winds, going in opposite directions, generate eddies of all sizes that manifest in storms swirling in the atmosphere. At the highest level "pop-up clouds," the small, bright clouds that amass at the edge of one of these fronts, are thought to be parcels of air pushed up to the altitude at which ammonia ice condenses. Although they appear to be small, these bright storms may be 25 to 50 kilometers across.

    This image captures Jupiter's North Temperate Belt. It was taken Oct. 16, 2021, at 10:11 a.m. PDT (1:11 p.m. EDT) as NASA's Juno spacecraft performed its 37th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 3,950 kilometers from the planet's cloud tops at a latitude of 38.57 degrees.

    Bild:
    Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
    Image processing: Brian Swift CC BY

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  • Jupiter, Stürme in der nördlichen gemäßigten Zone

    Jupiter, Stürme in der nördlichen gemäßigten Zone

    The three-dimensional character of Jupiter's cloud decks is captured in this image of the planet's North Equatorial Belt. Orange storms peek out from under banks of dark gray clouds. Lighter tan and gray clouds cast narrow shadows on the dark gray cloud bank below. At the top are the "pop-up clouds," parcels of air pushed up to the altitude at which ammonia ice condenses to make small, bright clouds.

    Jupiter appears to have a pastel hue to the naked eye through an Earth-based telescope. The color in this image from the JunoCam imager aboard NASA's Juno spacecraft has been "exaggerated," processed by citizen scientist Brian Swift to bring out subtle differences. The result is that the cloud layering is more obvious than in the original image.

    This image was taken Oct. 16, 2021, at 10:07 a.m. PDT (1:07 p.m. EDT) as Juno performed its 37th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 6,016 kilometers from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a latitude of 49.17 degrees.

    Bild:
    Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
    Image processing: Brian Swift CC BY

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  • Zwei Sturmsysteme im Detail in den nördlichen Breiten Jupiters

    Zwei Sturmsysteme im Detail in den nördlichen Breiten Jupiters

    This image shows two of Jupiter's large rotating storms, captured by Juno's visible-light imager, JunoCam, on Juno's 38th perijove pass, on Nov. 29, 2021.

    This image was acquired at 50 degrees 5 minutes north latitude, at an altitude of 6,140 kilometers. Atmospheric details as small as 4 kilometers can be discerned in the image. Bright "pop-up" clouds are visible above the lower storm, casting shadows on the cloud bank below. Although the pop-up clouds appear small in comparison to the large storm below, such clouds are typically 50 kilometers across.

    Bild:
    Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
    Image processing: Kevin M. Gill CC BY

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  • Jupiter, globale Aufnahme mit Aurora am Nordpol

    Jupiter, globale Aufnahme mit Aurora am Nordpol

    Astronomers are using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to study auroras — stunning light shows in a planet's atmosphere — on the poles of the largest planet in the solar system, Jupiter.

    The auroras were photographed during a series of Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph far-ultraviolet-light observations taking place as NASA's Juno spacecraft approaches and enters into orbit around Jupiter. The aim of the program is to determine how Jupiter's auroras respond to changing conditions in the solar wind, a stream of charged particles emitted from the sun.

    The full-color disk of Jupiter in this image was separately photographed at a different time by Hubble's Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program, a long-term Hubble project that annually captures global maps of the outer planets.

    Bild: NASA, ESA, and J. Nichols (University of Leicester)
    Acknowledgment: A. Simon (NASA/GSFC) and the OPAL team

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