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Zusammenstellung ausgewählter Bilder zu Saturn, die um weiterführenden Links mit der Möglichkeit des Downloads ergänzt wurden.

  • Saturn, Teil des Ringsystems im ultraviolettem Spektrum, farbverstärkt, Voyager 2

    Saturn, Teil des Ringsystems im ultraviolettem Spektrum, farbverstärkt, Voyager 2

    Possible variations in chemical composition from one part of Saturn's ring system to another are visible in this Voyager 2 picture as subtle color variations that can be recorded with special computer-processing techniques. This highly enhanced color view was assembled from clear, orange and ultraviolet frames obtained Aug. 17 from a distance of 8.9 million kilometers . In addition to the previously known blue color of the C-ring and the Cassini Division, the picture shows additional color differences between the inner B-ring and outer region (where the spokes form) and between these and the A-ring. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Saturn, Detailaufnahme des C-Rings, Voyager 2

    Saturn, Detailaufnahme des C-Rings, Voyager 2

    This view focusing on Saturn's C-ring (and to a lesser extent, the B-ring at top and left) was compiled from three separate images taken through ultraviolet, clear and green filters. On Aug. 23, when it acquired these frames, Voyager 2 was 2.7 million kilometers from the planet. More than 60 bright and dark ringlets are evident here; the small, bland squares are caused by the removal of reseau (reference) marks during processing. In general, C-ring material is very bland and gray, the color of dirty ice. Color differences between this ring and the B-ring indicate differing surface compositions for the material composing these complex structures.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Saturns Ringsystem, Detailansicht der Ringe B und C im Ultraviolett

    Saturns Ringsystem, Detailansicht der Ringe B und C im Ultraviolett

    Images taken during the Cassini spacecraft's orbital insertion on June 30 show definite compositional variation within the rings.

    This image shows, from left to right, the outer portion of the C ring and inner portion of the B ring. The B ring begins a little more than halfway across the image. The general pattern is from "dirty" particles indicated by red to cleaner ice particles shown in turquoise in the outer parts of the rings.

    The ring system begins from the inside out with the D, C, B and A rings followed by the F, G and E rings.

    This image was taken with the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph instrument, which is capable of resolving the rings to show features up to 97 kilometers across, roughly 100 times the resolution of ultraviolet data obtained by the Voyager 2 spacecraft.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/University of Colorado

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  • Saturns Ringsystem, Nahaufnahme des F-Rings von der unbeleuchteten Seite

    Saturns Ringsystem, Nahaufnahme des F-Rings von der unbeleuchteten Seite

    This is one of the first images taken of Saturn's F ring by the Cassini spacecraft after it successfully entered Saturn's orbit. It was taken by the spacecraft's narrow angle camera and shows the sunlit side of the rings.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturns Ringsystem, Encke-Teilung im Detail von der unbeleuchteten Seite

    Saturns Ringsystem, Encke-Teilung im Detail von der unbeleuchteten Seite

    This image shows in superb detail the region in Saturn's rings known as the Encke Gap. It was taken by the narrow angle camera on the Cassini spacecraft after successful entry into Saturn's orbit. The view shows the sunlit side of the rings.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Detailaufnahme der Strukturen des B-Rings aus 824.000 km Entfernung

    Detailaufnahme der Strukturen des B-Rings aus 824.000 km Entfernung

    Variations in ring particle concentration give Saturn's brilliant rings the appearance of ripples in a pond in this close-up view. Many of the gaps and wavelike patterns elsewhere in the rings are due to the gravitational influence of Saturn's moons, but the origin of much of the structure in the B ring seen here is still unexplained.

    The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow angle camera on Oct. 29, 2004, at a distance of approximately 824,000 kilometers from Saturn. The image scale is 4.5 kilometers per pixel. The image has been slightly contrast-enhanced to aid visibility.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Dione vor Saturn mit Ringsystem in Kantenstellung und Ringschatten

    Dione vor Saturn mit Ringsystem in Kantenstellung und Ringschatten

    Cool and icy Dione floats in front of giant Saturn bedecked in a dazzling array of colors.

    The surface of Dione, which exhibits contrasting bright and dark areas when viewed up close, appears pale in this image. It is Saturn's multi-hued cloud bands that boldly steal the show. Discrete clouds and eddies in Saturn's northern hemisphere can be seen within the faint shadows of the rings on the planet. Dione is 1,118 kilometers across.

    Cassini is in a phase of its mission in which its orbit will be nearly equatorial for some time. This view was obtained from about one-third of a degree out of the ring plane.

    Images taken with red, green and blue filters were used to create this natural-color view. The images were obtained with the wide-angle camera on Sept. 22, 2005, from a distance of approximately 803,000 kilometers from Dione and at a sun-Dione-spacecraft, or phase, angle of about 43 degrees. The image scale is about 48 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Ringsystem und Teil des Planeten, Simulation auf Basis der gemessenen optischen Tiefe

    Ringsystem und Teil des Planeten, Simulation auf Basis der gemessenen optischen Tiefe

    Specially designed Cassini orbits place Earth and Cassini on opposite sides of Saturn's rings, a geometry known as occultation. Cassini conducted the first radio occultation observation of Saturn's rings on May 3, 2005.

    Three simultaneous radio signals of 0.94, 3.6, and 13 centimeter wavelength (Ka-, X-, and S-bands) were sent from Cassini through the rings to Earth. The observed change of each signal as Cassini moved behind the rings provided a profile of the distribution of ring material as a function of distance from Saturn, or an optical depth profile.

    This simulated image was constructed from the measured optical depth profiles. It depicts the observed ring structure at about 10 kilometers in resolution. Color is used to represent information about ring particle sizes in different regions based on the measured effects of the three radio signals.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Saturn als Sichel mit Ringsystem in Kantenstellung

    Saturn als Sichel mit Ringsystem in Kantenstellung

    Cassini takes in a wide-angle view of majestic, golden-hued Saturn ... home to our robotic spacecraft for two years now. The ringplane cuts across the center of Saturn's crescent which wears shadows cast by the icy rings.

    The planet's now familiar blue and pink hues generally are more subtle in high-phase views from the Cassini wide-angle camera. "Phase" refers to the angle formed between the Sun, the planet and the spacecraft.

    The view is a composite of two sets of color images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters. The images were combined to create a color view that approximates the scene as it might appear to human eyes.

    The images were taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on May 24, 2006 at a distance of approximately 1.3 million kilometers from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 139 degrees. Image scale is 76 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Ringsystem von der unbeleuchteten Seite aus mit ausgeblendetem Saturn sowie Epimetheus, Pandora und Janus

    Ringsystem von der unbeleuchteten Seite aus mit ausgeblendetem Saturn sowie Epimetheus, Pandora und Janus

    Our robotic emissary, flying high above Saturn, captured this view of an alien copper-colored ring world. The overexposed planet has deliberately been removed to show the unlit rings alone, seen from an elevation of 60 degrees, the highest Cassini has yet attained.

    The view is a mosaic of 27 images --nine separate sets of red, green and blue images-- taken over the course of about 45 minutes, as Cassini scanned across the entire main ring system.

    The planet's shadow carves a dark swath across the ring plane at the right. The overexposed planet has been removed.

    Moons visible in this image: Epimetheus (116 kilometers across) at the 1 o'clock position, Pandora (84 kilometers across) at the 5 o'clock position, Janus (181 kilometers across) at the 10 o'clock position.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Ringsystem, Querschnitt der unbeleuchteten Seite von innen nach aussen

    Ringsystem, Querschnitt der unbeleuchteten Seite von innen nach aussen

    A scan across Saturn's incredible halo of ice rings yields a study in precision and order.

    This natural color mosaic was acquired by the Cassini spacecraft as it soared 39 degrees above the unilluminated side of the rings.

    Major named gaps are labeled at the top. The main rings themselves, along with the F ring, are labeled at the bottom, along with their inner and outer boundaries.

    This mosaic was constructed from narrow-angle camera images taken immediately after a wide-angle camera mosaic. Radial features can be seen in the rings that are about ten times smaller than in the wide-angle view. This scan is rotated 180 degrees in order to present the rings with distance from Saturn increasing left to right.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturn mit Ringsystem in Kantenstellung, Schattenwurf und Rhea im Vordergrund

    Saturn mit Ringsystem in Kantenstellung, Schattenwurf und Rhea im Vordergrund

    Like a silvery pearl, an icy moon crosses the face of Saturn, while two of its siblings cast shadows onto the planet.

    Rhea (1,528 kilometers across) hangs in the foreground. Near upper left on Saturn is the small shadow of Mimas. Near lower right is the penumbral shadow of Iapetus -- the part of the moon's shadow where Iapetus does not completely block the sun.

    This view looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings from less than a degree above the ringplane. The rings' shadows drape across the northern hemisphere.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturn, Detail der Atmosphäre mit Wirbeln und Bändern

    Saturn, Detail der Atmosphäre mit Wirbeln und Bändern

    Whorls, streamers and eddies play in the banded atmosphere of a gas giant. Strong image enhancement renders unto Saturn's clouds a grainy texture not unlike sandstone. However, the loss in delicate smoothness is compensated for by an increase in discernible detail.

    The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera using a combination of spectral filters sensitive to wavelengths of infrared light centered at 728 (green channel), 752 (red channel), and 890 (blue channel) nanometers. The semi-transparent red features across the image are clouds detected by the 752 nanometer filter.

    The view was acquired on Aug. 19, 2005 at a distance of approximately 492,000 kilometers from Saturn. Image scale is 26 kilometers per pixel.

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  • Saturns Nordpol mit hexagonaler Struktur im Infrarot

    Saturns Nordpol mit hexagonaler Struktur im Infrarot

    A bizarre six-sided feature encircling the north pole of Saturn near 78 degrees north latitude has been spied by the visual and infrared mapping spectrometer on NASA's Cassini spacecraft. This image is one of the first clear images ever taken of the north polar region as seen from a unique polar perspective.

    Originally discovered and last observed by a spacecraft during NASA's Voyager flybys of the early 1980's, the new views of this polar hexagon taken in late 2006 prove that this is an unusually long-lived feature on Saturn.

    This image is the first to capture the entire feature and north polar region in one shot, and is also the first polar view using Saturn's thermal glow at 5 microns (seven times the wavelength visible to the human eye) as the light source. This allows the pole to be revealed during the nighttime conditions presently underway during north polar winter. Previous images from Voyager and from ground-based telescopes suffered from poor viewing perspectives, which placed the feature and the north pole at the extreme northern limb (edge) of the planet.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

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  • Saturns Ringsystem in natürlichen Farben

    Saturns Ringsystem in natürlichen Farben

    Saturn's softly glowing rings shine in scattered sunlight.

    The B ring presents a remarkable difference in brightness between the near and far arms (bottom and top of the image, respectively). The strong variation in brightness could be due to the presence of wake-like features in the B ring.

    This view looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings from about 5 degrees above the ringplane. Images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters were combined to create this natural color view. The images were acquired at a distance of approximately 574,000 kilometers from Saturn. At the center of the image, the Sun-ring-spacecraft, or phase, angle is 114 degrees, and the image scale is 34 kilometers per pixel in the radial, or outward from Saturn, direction.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturn, Nordpol im Detail mit Stürmen und Teil des nordpolaren Hexagons in Echtfarbe

    Saturn, Nordpol im Detail mit Stürmen und Teil des nordpolaren Hexagons in Echtfarbe

    Saturn's north pole is littered with storms, as we see in this color view of the pole. A bit of the north polar hexagon is also visible at the upper-right.

    Cassini scientists are looking forward to sunrise on this pole next year so that they can better study it in visible light.

    Images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters were combined to create this full color view. The images were obtained with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Nov. 16, 2008 at a distance of approximately 673,000 kilometers from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 71 degrees. Image scale is 37 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturns südpolarer Wolkenwirkel im Detail im polarisiertem Infrarot

    Saturns südpolarer Wolkenwirkel im Detail im polarisiertem Infrarot

    Shadows reveal the topography of Saturn's south polar vortex. At high resolution, a new, inner ring of isolated, bright clouds is seen. These clouds are localized regions of convective upwelling, an important clue to understanding how heat energy is transported in Saturn's atmosphere.

    Sunlight illuminates the scene from upper right, and the higher altitude rings of clouds surrounding the pole cast shadows toward lower left. North on Saturn is up.

    The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 15, 2008, with a combination of spectral filters sensitive to wavelengths of polarized infrared light centered at 746 and 938 nanometers. The view was acquired from 24 degrees below the ringplane, at a distance of approximately 778,000 kilometers from Saturn. The sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle is about 30 degrees. Image scale is 4 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturn mit den Monden Titan, Janus, Mimas, Pandora, Epimetheus und Enceladus

    Saturn mit den Monden Titan, Janus, Mimas, Pandora, Epimetheus und Enceladus

    As Saturn advances in its orbit toward equinox and the sun gradually moves northward on the planet, the motion of Saturn's ring shadows and the changing colors of its atmosphere continue to transform the face of Saturn as seen by Cassini.

    This captivating natural color view was created from images collected shortly after Cassini began its extended Equinox Mission in July 2008.

    This mosaic combines 30 images—10 each of red, green and blue light—taken over the course of approximately two hours as Cassini panned its wide-angle camera across the entire planet and ring system on July 23, 2008, from a southerly elevation of 6 degrees.

    Six moons complete this constructed panorama: Titan (5,150 kilometers across), Janus (179 kilometers across), Mimas (396 kilometers across), Pandora (81 kilometers across), Epimetheus (113 kilometers across) and Enceladus (504 kilometers across).

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturn zur Tag- und Nachtgleiche mit den Monden Janus, Epimetheus, Pandora und Atlas

    Saturn zur Tag- und Nachtgleiche mit den Monden Janus, Epimetheus, Pandora und Atlas

    Of the countless equinoxes Saturn has seen since the birth of the solar system, this one, captured here in a mosaic of light and dark, is the first witnessed up close by an emissary from Earth … none other than our faithful robotic explorer, Cassini.

    Seen from our planet, the view of Saturn's rings during equinox is extremely foreshortened and limited. But in orbit around Saturn, Cassini had no such problems. From 20 degrees above the ring plane, Cassini's wide angle camera shot 75 exposures in succession for this mosaic showing Saturn, its rings, and a few of its moons a day and a half after exact Saturn equinox, when the sun's disk was exactly overhead at the planet's equator.

    The moon Janus (179 kilometers across) is on the lower left of this image. Epimetheus (113 kilometers across) appears near the middle bottom. Pandora (81 kilometers across) orbits outside the rings on the right of the image. The small moon Atlas (30 kilometers across) orbits inside the thin F ring on the right of the image. The brightnesses of all the moons, relative to the planet, have been enhanced between 30 and 60 times to make them more easily visible. Other bright specks are background stars. Spokes -- ghostly radial markings on the B ring -- are visible on the right of the image.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Globale Ansicht des Saturm in Echtfarbe aus 2,3 Mio. km Entfernung

    Globale Ansicht des Saturm in Echtfarbe aus 2,3 Mio. km Entfernung

    This was Cassini's view from orbit around Saturn on Jan. 2, 2010. In this image, the rings on the night side of the planet have been brightened significantly to more clearly reveal their features. On the day side, the rings are illuminated both by direct sunlight, and by light reflected off Saturn's cloud tops.

    This natural-color view is a composite of images taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft's narrow-angle camera at a distance of approximately 2.3 million kilometers from Saturn.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturns Nachtseite mit leuchtender Atmosphäre am Rand und Teil des Ringsystems

    Saturns Nachtseite mit leuchtender Atmosphäre am Rand und Teil des Ringsystems

    A startling silhouette of Saturn is created in this Cassini spacecraft portrait.

    Although the sun is eclipsed by Saturn in this dramatic image, some sunlight scatters through the uppermost part of the atmosphere to reach Cassini's cameras.

    This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ringplane.

    The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Feb. 13, 2010 using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 392,000 kilometers from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 174 degrees. Image scale is 20 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturn mit gigantischem Sturmsystem in der nördlichen Hemisphäre

    Saturn mit gigantischem Sturmsystem in der nördlichen Hemisphäre

    The huge storm churning through the atmosphere in Saturn's northern hemisphere overtakes itself as it encircles the planet in this true-color view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

    This picture, captured on Feb. 25, 2011, was taken about 12 weeks after the storm began, and the clouds by this time had formed a tail that wrapped around the planet. Some of the clouds moved south and got caught up in a current that flows to the east (to the right) relative to the storm head. This tail, which appears as slightly blue clouds south and west (left) of the storm head, can be seen encountering the storm head in this view.

    This storm is the largest, most intense storm observed on Saturn by NASA's Voyager or Cassini spacecraft. It is still active today. As scientists have tracked this storm over several months, they have found it covers 500 times the area of the largest of the southern hemisphere storms observed earlier in the Cassini mission. The shadow cast by Saturn's rings has a strong seasonal effect, and it is possible that the switch to powerful storms now being located in the northern hemisphere is related to the change of seasons after the planet's August 2009 equinox.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturn mit Schwanz eines großen Sturms in der nördlichen Hemisphäre in Falschfarben

    Saturn mit Schwanz eines großen Sturms in der nördlichen Hemisphäre in Falschfarben

    This false-color mosaic from NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows the tail of Saturn's huge northern storm.

    The head of the storm is beyond the horizon in this view. Saturn's atmosphere and its rings are shown here in a false color composite made from 12 images taken in near-infrared light through filters that are sensitive to varying degrees of methane absorption. Red and orange colors in this view indicate clouds that are deep in the atmosphere. Yellow and green colors, most noticeable near the top of the view, indicate intermediate clouds. White and blue indicate high clouds and haze. The rings appear as a thin horizontal line of bright blue because they are outside of the atmosphere and not affected by methane absorption.

    The images were taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera using a combination of spectral filters sensitive to wavelengths of near-infrared light. The images filtered at 890 nanometers are projected as blue. The images filtered at 728 nanometers are projected as green, and images filtered at 752 nanometers are projected as red.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturn und Ringsystem mit Schattenwurf sowie Mond Tethys

    Saturn und Ringsystem mit Schattenwurf sowie Mond Tethys

    Tethys may not be tiny by normal standards, but when it is captured alongside Saturn, it can't help but seem pretty small.

    Even Saturn's rings appear to dwarf Tethys (1,062 kilometers across), which is in the upper left of the image, although scientists believe the moon to be many times more massive than the entire ring system combined.

    This view looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings from about 18 degrees below the ringplane. The image was taken in green light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Aug. 19, 2012.

    The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 2.4 million kilometers from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 63 degrees. Image scale is 138 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Großer Sturm in der nördlichen Hemisphäre Saturns in Falschfarben

    Großer Sturm in der nördlichen Hemisphäre Saturns in Falschfarben

    These false-color mosaics from NASA's Cassini spacecraft capture lightning striking within the huge storm that encircled Saturn's northern hemisphere for much of 2011.

    The larger mosaic on the left of the panel shows the lightning flash, which appears as a blue dot. The smaller mosaic on the right is composed of images taken 30 minutes later, and the lightning is not flashing at that time.

    This lightning flash appears only in the filter sensitive to blue visible light, and the images were enhanced to increase the visibility of the lightning.

    he images were obtained with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on March 6, 2011, at a distance of approximately 3.3 million kilometers from Saturn and at a sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 83 degrees. These mosaics are simple cylindrical map projections, defined such that a square pixel subtends equal intervals of latitude and longitude. At higher latitudes, the pixel size in the north-south direction remains the same, but the pixel size (in terms of physical extent on the planet) in the east-west direction becomes smaller. The pixel size is set at the equator, where the distances along the sides are equal. This map has a pixel size of 20 kilometers at the equator.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Nachtseite des Saturnsystems in nahezu Echtfarbe

    Nachtseite des Saturnsystems in nahezu Echtfarbe

    On July 19, 2013, in an event celebrated the world over, NASA's Cassini spacecraft slipped into Saturn's shadow and turned to image the planet, seven of its moons, its inner rings -- and, in the background, our home planet, Earth.

    With the sun's powerful and potentially damaging rays eclipsed by Saturn itself, Cassini's onboard cameras were able to take advantage of this unique viewing geometry. They acquired a panoramic mosaic of the Saturn system that allows scientists to see details in the rings and throughout the system as they are backlit by the sun.

    With both Cassini's wide-angle and narrow-angle cameras aimed at Saturn, Cassini was able to capture 323 images in just over four hours. This final mosaic uses 141 of those wide-angle images. Images taken using the red, green and blue spectral filters of the wide-angle camera were combined and mosaicked together to create this natural-color view.

    This view looks toward the unlit side of the rings from about 17 degrees below the ring plane. Cassini was approximately 1.2 million kilometers from Saturn when the images in this mosaic were taken. Image scale on Saturn is about 72 kilometers per pixel.

    NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI

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  • Saturns Nordpolregion mit Hexagon im nahen Infrarot

    Saturns Nordpolregion mit Hexagon im nahen Infrarot

    Sunlight truly has come to Saturn's north pole. The whole northern region is bathed in sunlight in this view from late 2016, feeble though the light may be at Saturn's distant domain in the solar system.

    The hexagon-shaped jet-stream is fully illuminated here. In this image, the planet appears darker in regions where the cloud deck is lower, such the region interior to the hexagon. Mission experts on Saturn's atmosphere are taking advantage of the season and Cassini's favorable viewing geometry to study this and other weather patterns as Saturn's northern hemisphere approaches Summer solstice.

    This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 51 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Sept. 9, 2016 using a spectral filter which preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 728 nanometers.

    The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.2 million kilometers from Saturn. Image scale is 74 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Blick auf die nördliche Hemisphäre Saturns, Einzelbild aus Movie

    Blick auf die nördliche Hemisphäre Saturns, Einzelbild aus Movie

    NASA's Cassini spacecraft stared at Saturn for nearly 44 hours on April 25 to 27, 2016, to obtain this movie showing just over four Saturn days.

    With Cassini's orbit being moved closer to the planet in preparation for the mission's 2017 finale, scientists took this final opportunity to capture a long movie in which the planet's full disk fit into a single wide-angle camera frame.

    Visible at top is the giant hexagon-shaped jet stream that surrounds the planet's north pole. Each side of this huge shape is slightly wider than Earth.

    When it began taking images for this movie sequence, Cassini was 2,973,000 kilometers from Saturn, with an image scale of 355 kilometers per pixel. When it finished gathering the images, the spacecraft had moved 275,000 kilometers closer to the planet, with an image scale of 322 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturns Nordpolregion mit Hexagon im nahen Infrarot

    Saturns Nordpolregion mit Hexagon im nahen Infrarot

    Saturn's hexagonal polar jet stream is the shining feature of almost every view of the north polar region of Saturn. The region, in shadow for the first part of the Cassini mission, now enjoys full sunlight, which enables Cassini scientists to directly image it in reflected light.

    Although the sunlight falling on the north pole of Saturn is enough to allow us to image and study the region, it does not provide much warmth. In addition to being low in the sky (just like summer at Earth's poles), the sun is nearly ten times as distant from Saturn as from Earth. This results in the sunlight being only about 1 percent as intense as at our planet.

    This view looks toward Saturn from about 31 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Jan. 22, 2017 using a spectral filter which preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 939 nanometers.

    The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 900,000 kilometers from Saturn. Image scale is 54 kilometers per pixel.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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  • Saturns Ringsystem, Detail des inneren zentralen Teil des B-Rings

    Saturns Ringsystem, Detail des inneren zentralen Teil des B-Rings

    These are the highest-resolution color images of any part of Saturn's rings, to date, showing a portion of the inner-central part of the planet's B Ring. The view is a mosaic of two images that show a region that lies between 98,600 and 105,500 kilometers from Saturn's center.

    This image is a natural color composite, created using images taken with red, green and blue spectral filters. The pale tan color is generally not perceptible with the naked eye in telescope views, especially given that Saturn has a similar hue.

    The material responsible for bestowing this color on the rings -- which are mostly water ice and would otherwise appear white -- is a matter of intense debate among ring scientists that will hopefully be settled by new in-situ observations before the end of Cassini's mission.

    This image was taken on July 6, 2017, with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera. The image was acquired on the sunlit side of the rings from a distance of 76,000 kilometers away from the area pictured. The image scale is about 3 kilometers per pixel. The phase angle, or sun-ring-spacecraft angle, is 90 degrees.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

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