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Zusammenstellung ausgewählter Bilder zu Uranus und seinen Monden, die um weiterführenden Links mit der Möglichkeit des Downloads ergänzt wurden.

  • Uranus, globale Ansicht in Echtfarben

    Uranus, globale Ansicht in Echtfarben

    This is an image taken by the spacecraft Voyager 2 in 1986. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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  • Uranus, Teil des Ringsystems in Falschfarben

    Uranus, Teil des Ringsystems in Falschfarben

    This false-color view of the rings of Uranus was made from images taken by Voyager 2 on Jan. 21, 1986, from a distance of 4.17 million kilometers (2.59 million miles). All nine known rings are visible here; the somewhat fainter, pastel lines seen between them are contributed by the computer enhancement. Two images each in the green, clear and violet filters were added together and averaged to find the proper color differences between the rings. The final image was made from these three color averages and represents an enhanced, false-color view. The image shows that the brightest, or epsilon, ring at top is neutral in color, with the fainter eight other rings showing color differences between them. Moving down, toward Uranus, we see the delta, gamma and eta rings in shades of blue and green; the beta and alpha rings in somewhat lighter tones; and then a final set of three, known simply as the 4, 5 and 6 rings, in faint off- white tones. Scientists will use this color information to try to understand the nature and origin of the ring material.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Uranusmond Titania, globale Farbansicht

    Uranusmond Titania, globale Farbansicht

    This high-resolution color composite of Titania was made from Voyager 2 images taken Jan. 24, 1986, as the spacecraft neared its closest approach to Uranus. Voyager acquired this image of Titania, one of the large moons of Uranus, through the violet and clear filters. The spacecraft was about 500,000 kilometers (300,000 miles) away; the picture shows details about 9 km (6 mi) in size. Titania has a diameter of about 1,600 km (1,000 mi). In addition to many scars due to impacts, Titania displays evidence of other geologic activity at some point in its history. The large, trenchlike feature near the terminator (day-night boundary) at middle right suggests at least one episode of tectonic activity. Another, basinlike structure near the upper right is evidence of an ancient period of heavy impact activity. The neutral gray color of Titania is characteristic of the Uranian satellites as a whole.

    The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Farbverstärkte Ansicht der Uranusatmosphäre

    Farbverstärkte Ansicht der Uranusatmosphäre

    Processing brings out Uranus’ atmosphere.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Uranusmond Ariel, regionale Ansicht, höchste Auflösung

    Uranusmond Ariel, regionale Ansicht, höchste Auflösung

    This picture is part of the highest-resolution Voyager 2 imaging sequence of Ariel, a moon of Uranus about 1,300 kilometers (800 miles) in diameter. The clear-filter, narrow-angle image was taken Jan. 24, 1986, from a distance of 130,000 km (80,000 mi). The complexity of Ariel's surface indicates that a variety of geologic processes have occurred. The numerous craters, for example, are indications of an old surface bombarded by meteroids over a long period. Also conspicuous at this resolution, about 2.4 km (1.5 mi), are linear grooves (evidence of tectonic activity that has broken up the surface) and smooth patches (indicative of deposition of material). The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Uranusmond Miranda, Detailansicht mit unterschiedlichen Geländetypen

    Uranusmond Miranda, Detailansicht mit unterschiedlichen Geländetypen

    This image of Miranda, obtained by Voyager 2 on approach, shows an unusual 'chevron' figure and regions of distinctly differing terrain on the Uranian moon. Voyager was 42,000 kilometers (26,000 miles) away when its narrow-angle camera acquired this clear- filter view. Grooved areas baring light and dark bands, distinct from other areas of mottled terrain, are visible at this resolution of about 600 meters (2,000 feet). The bright V-shaped feature in the grooved areas is the 'chevron' observed in earlier, lower-resolution images. Cutting across the bands are sinuous scarps, probably faults. Superimposed on both types of terrain are many bowl-shaped impact craters less than 5 km (3 mi) wide. The entire picture spans an area about 220 km (140 mi) across.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Uranusmond Umbriel, globale Ansicht der südlichen Hemisphäre

    Uranusmond Umbriel, globale Ansicht der südlichen Hemisphäre

    The southern hemisphere of Umbriel displays heavy cratering in this Voyager 2 image, taken Jan. 24, 1986, from a distance of 557,000 kilometers (346,000 miles). This frameis the most detailed image of Umbriel, with a resolution of about 10 km (6 mi). Umbriel is the darkest of Uranus' larger moons and the one that appears to have experienced the lowest level of geological activity. It has a diameter of about 1,200 km (750 mi) and reflects only 16 percent of the light striking its surface; in the latter respect, Umbriel is similar to lunar highland areas. Umbriel is heavily cratered but lacks the numerous bright- ray craters seen on the other large Uranian satellites; this results in a relatively uniform surface albedo (reflectivity). The prominent crater on the terminator (upper right) is about 110 km (70 mi) across and has a bright central peak. The strangest feature in this image (at top) is a curious bright ring, the most reflective area seen on Umbriel. The ring is about 140 km (90 miles) in diameter and lies near the satellite's equator. The nature of the ring is not known, although it might be a frost deposit, perhaps associated with an impact crater. Spots against the black background are due to 'noise' in the data.

    The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

  • Uranus, Ringsystem mit gleichmäßiger Verteilung kleiner Partikel

    Uranus, Ringsystem mit gleichmäßiger Verteilung kleiner Partikel

    This dramatic Voyager 2 picture reveals a continuous distribution of small particles throughout the Uranus ring system Voyager took this image while in the shadow of Uranus, at a distance of 236,000 kilometers (142,000 miles and a resolution of about 33 km (20 ml). This unique geometry -- the highest phase angle at which Voyager imaged the rings -- allows us to see lanes of fine dust particles not visible from other viewing angles. All the previously known rings are visible here however, some of the brighest featurer in the image are bright dust lanes not previously see The long exposure produced a noticeable, non-uniform smear as well as streaks due to trailed stars.

    The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Teil der Uranusringe und die kleinen Monde 1986U1, 1986U3 und 1986U4

    Teil der Uranusringe und die kleinen Monde 1986U1, 1986U3 und 1986U4

    Three of the newly discovered satellites of Uranus are captured in this Voyager 2 image taken Jan. 18, 1986, when the spacecraft was 7.7 million kilometers (4.8 million miles) from the planet. All three lie outside the orbits of Uranus nine known rings, the outermost of which, the epsilon ring, is seen at upper right. The largest of the three moons viewed here, 1986U1, was discovered Jan. 3; it is an estimated 9O km (55 mi) across and orbits Uranus once every 12 hours 19 minutes at a distance of 66.O9O km (41.O4O mi) from the planet's center. The other two moons are slightly smaller. 1986U3 orbits once every 11 hours 6 minutes at 61,75O km (38,35O mi), 1986U4 every 13 hours 24 minutes at 69,92O km (43,42O mi). They were discovered on Jan. 9 and 13, respectively. Long exposures were required to bring out these small objects; thus, as a result of the relative motions of the spacecraft and the moons, they appear slightly elongated.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Uranus, globale Ansichten der beiden Hemisphären im Infrarot und Darstellung des Ringsystems

    Uranus, globale Ansichten der beiden Hemisphären im Infrarot und Darstellung des Ringsystems

    An infrared composite image of the two hemispheres of Uranus obtained with Keck Telescope adaptive optics. The component colors of blue, green, and red were obtained from images made at near infrared wavelengths of 1.26, 1.62, and 2.1 microns respectively. The images were obtained on July 11 and 12, 2004. The North pole is at 4 o'clock.

    Bild: Lawrence Sromovsky, University of Wisconsin-Madison/W.W. Keck Observatory

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  • Uranusmond Oberon, globale Farbansicht

    Uranusmond Oberon, globale Farbansicht

    This Voyager 2 picture of Oberon is the best the spacecraft acquired of Uranus' outermost moon. The picture was taken shortly after 3:3O a.m. PST on Jan. 24, 1986, from a distance of 660,000 kilometers (410,000 miles). The color was reconstructed from images taken through the narrow-angle camera's violet, clear and green filters. The picture shows features, as small as 12 km (7 mi) on the moon's surface. Clearly visible are several large impact craters in Oberon's icy surface surrounded by bright rays similar to those seen on Jupiter's moon Callisto. Quite prominent near the center of Oberon's disk is a large crater with a bright central peak and a floor partially covered with very dark material. This may be icy, carbon-rich material erupted onto the crater floor sometime after the crater formed. Another striking topographic feature is a large mountain, about 6 km (4 mi) high, peeking out on the lower left limb.

    The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Uranus, globale Ansicht, farbverstärkt

    Uranus, globale Ansicht, farbverstärkt

    This false-color Voyager picture of Uranus shows a discrete cloud seen as a bright streak near the planet's limb. The picture is a highly processed composite of three images obtained Jan. 14, 1986, when the spacecraft was 12.9 million kilometers (8.0 million miles) from the planet. The cloud visible here is the most prominent feature seen in a series of Voyager images designed to track atmospheric motions. (The occasional donut- shaped features, including one at the bottom, are shadows cast by dust in the camera optics; the processing necessary to bring out the faint features on the planet also brings out these camera blemishes.) Three separate images were shuttered through violet, blue and orange filters.. In a true- color image, the cloud would be barely discernible; the false color helps bring out additional details. The different colors imply variations in vertical structure, but as yet is is not possible to be specific about such differences. One possibility is that the Uranian atmosphere contains smog-like constituents, in which case some color differences may represent differences in how these molecules are distributed.

    The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Uranusmond Ariel, globale Ansicht

    Uranusmond Ariel, globale Ansicht

    Distinct bright patches are visible on Ariel, the brightest of Uranus' five largest satellites. Voyager 2 obtained this image Jan. 22, 1986, from a distance of 2.52 million kilometers (1.56 million miles). The clear-filter image, obtained with the narrow-angle camera, shows a resolution of 47 km (29 miles). Ariel is about 1,3OO km (8OO mi) in diameter. This image shows several distinct bright areas that reflect nearly 45 percent of the incident sunlight; on average, the satellite displays a reflectivity of about 25-3O percent. The bright areas are probably fresh water ice, perhaps excavated by impacts. The south pole of Ariel is slightly off center of the disk in this view. Voyager 2 will obtain its best views of the satellite on Jan. 24, at a closest-approach distance of 127.OOO km (79.OOO mi).

    The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Obere Atmosphere des Uranus

    Obere Atmosphere des Uranus

    This enhancement of a Voyager 2 image, emphaszes the high-level haze in Uranus’ upper atmosphere. Clouds are obscured by the overlying atmosphere.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Kleiner Uranusmond 1985U1, globale Ansicht

    Kleiner Uranusmond 1985U1, globale Ansicht

    Several craters are seen on the surface of 1985U1, one of several small moons of Uranus discovered by Voyager 2. The spacecraft acquired this single image -- the only close-up it obtained of any of the new moons -- on Jan. 24, 1986. At the time, Voyager was at a distance of about 500,000 kilometers (300,000 miles) from 1985U1, yielding a resolution of about 10 km (6 mi) in this clear-filter, narrow-angle image. The moon was found Dec. 30, 1985; it was the first and largest of nearly a dozen satellites discovered by the spacecraft cameras. This image shows 1985U1 to be a dark, nearly spherical object, with a diameter of about 150 km (90 mi); the dark surface reflects only 7 percent of the incident light.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Uranus, zwei globale Ansichten in Echtfarbe und farbverstärkt

    Uranus, zwei globale Ansichten in Echtfarbe und farbverstärkt

    These two pictures of Uranus were compiled from images recorded by Voyager 2 on Jan. 1O, 1986, when the NASA spacecraft was 18 million kilometers (11 million miles) from the planet. The images were obtained by Voyager's narrow-angle camera; the view is toward the planet's pole of rotation, which lies just left of center. The picture on the left has been processed to show Uranus as human eyes would see it from the vantage point of the spacecraft. The second picture is an exaggerated false-color view that reveals details not visible in the true- color view -- including indications of what could be a polar haze of smog- like particles. The true-color picture was made by combining pictures taken through blue, green and orange filters. The dark shading of the upper right edge of the disk is the terminator, or day- night boundary. The blue-green appearance of Uranus results from methane in the atmosphere; this gas absorbs red wavelengths from the incoming sunlight, leaving the predominant bluish color seen here. The picture on the right uses false color and contrast enhancement to bring out subtle details in the polar region of the atmosphere.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Nachtseite des Uranus

    Nachtseite des Uranus

    This is a view of Uranus taken by Voyager 2. This image was taken through three color filters and recombined to produce the color image. JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Uranus, Teil des Ringsystems, alle neun Ringe

    Uranus, Teil des Ringsystems, alle neun Ringe

    Voyager 2 returned this picture of the Uranus rings on Jan. 22, 1986, from a distance of 2.52 million kilometers (1.56 million miles). All nine known rings are visible in this image, a 15- second exposure through the clear filter on Voyager's narrow- angle camera. The rings are quite dark and very narrow. The most prominent and outermost of the nine, called epsilon, is seen at top. The next three in toward Uranus -- called delta, gamma and eta -- are much fainter and narrower than the epsilon ring. Then come the beta and alpha rings and finally the innermost grouping, known simply as the 4, 5 and 6 rings. The last three are very faint and are at the limit of detection for the Voyager camera. Uranus' rings range in width from about 1OO km (6O mi) at the widest part of the epsilon ring to only a few kilometers for most of the others. This image was processed to enhance these narrow features; the bright dots are imperfections on the camera detector.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Miranda, globale Ansicht

    Miranda, globale Ansicht

    Mosaic of high-resolution images of Miranda. One wide-angle and eight narrow-angle camera images of Miranda were combined in this view. The controlled mosaic was transformed to an orthographic view centered on the south pole. The trapezoidal region (about 200 km on a side) occurs near the south pole and is located near the center of the mosaic. The trapezoid's outer boundary and its internal patterns of ridges and band of contrasting albedo display numerous sharp corners.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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