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Zusammenstellung ausgewählter Bilder zu Neptun und seinen Monden, die um weiterführenden Links mit der Möglichkeit des Downloads ergänzt wurden.

  • Neptun, globale Ansicht

    Neptun, globale Ansicht

    During August 16 and 17, 1989, the Voyager 2 camera was used to photograph Neptune almost continuously, recording approximately two and one-half rotations of the planet. These images represent the most complete set of full disk Neptune images that the spacecraft will acquire. This picture from the sequence shows two of the four cloud features which have been tracked by the Voyager cameras during the past two months. The large dark oval near the western limb (the left edge) circuits Neptune every 18.3 hours. The bright clouds immediately to the south and east of this oval are seen to substantially change their appearances in periods as short as four hours. The second dark spot, near the terminator (lower right edge), circuits Neptune every 16.1 hours.

    This image has been processed to enhance the visibility of small features, at some sacrifice of color fidelity. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Anflugsequenz von Voyager auf Triton, 10 globale Ansichten

    Anflugsequenz von Voyager auf Triton, 10 globale Ansichten

    Triton Voyager 2 approach sequence with latitude- longitude grid superposed. Details on Triton's surface unfold dramatically in this sequence of approach images. South Pole near the bottom of the images at the convergence of lines of longitude. Global and regional albedo features are visible in all of the images. The albedo features can be tracked in successive images and show that Triton has undergone about 3/4 of a rotation during the 4.3-day interval over which these images were obtained. A southern polar cap of bright pink, yellow, and white materials covers nearly all of the southern hemisphere; these materials consist of nitrogen ice with traces of other substances, including frozen methane and carbon monoxide. Feeble ultraviolet radiation from the sun is thought to act on methane to cause chemical reactions to the pinkish yellowish substances. At the time of the Voyager 2 flyby (Jan. 1989) Triton's southern hemisphere was starting the summer season and the South Pole was canted toward the sun day and night, such that the polar cap was sublimating under the relatively "hot" summer sun (surface temperature about 38 K, about -391 degree F). Numerous dark streaks on the southern polar nitrogen-ice cap are thought to consist of dark dust deposited by prevailing winds in Triton's tenuous nitrogen atmosphere. A bluish band, seen in all of the images, nearly circumstances Triton's equator; this band is thought to consist of fairly nitrogen frost, perhaps deposited in the decade prior to Voyager 2's flyby.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Neptun, globale Ansicht in Falschfarben

    Neptun, globale Ansicht in Falschfarben

    In this false color image of Neptune, objects that are deep in the atmosphere are blue, while those at higher altitudes are white. The image was taken by Voyager 2's wide-angle camera through an orange filter and two different methane filters. Light at methane wavelengths is mostly absorbed in the deeper atmosphere. The bright, white feature is a high altitude cloud just south of the Great Dark Spot. The hard, sharp inner boundary within the bright cloud is an artifact of computer processing on Earth. Other, smaller clouds associated with the Great Dark Spot are white or pink, and are also at high altitudes. A long, narrow band of high altitude clouds near the top of the image is located at 25 degrees north latitude, and faint hazes mark the equator and polar regions.

    The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Neptunmond Triton, globale Karte nach Daten von Voyager 2, farbverstärkt

    Neptunmond Triton, globale Karte nach Daten von Voyager 2, farbverstärkt

    The Voyager 2 spacecraft flew by Triton, a moon of Neptune, in the summer of 1989. Dr. Paul Schenk, a scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, used Voyager data to construct the best-ever global color map of Triton. This map has a resolution of 1,970 feet (600 meters) per pixel. The colors have been enhanced to bring out contrast but are a close approximation to Triton's natural colors. Voyager's "eyes" saw in colors slightly different from human eyes, and this map was produced using orange, green and blue filter images.

    The Voyager mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in Pasadena, California, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Caltech manages JPL for NASA.

    Bild: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Lunar and Planetary Institute

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  • Neptun, regionale Ansicht hochliegender weißer Wolken

    Neptun, regionale Ansicht hochliegender weißer Wolken

    This Voyager 2 high resolution color image, taken 2 hours before closest approach, provides obvious evidence of vertical relief in Neptune's bright cloud streaks. These clouds were observed at a latitude of 29 degrees north near Neptune's east terminator. The linear cloud forms are stretched approximately along lines of constant latitude and the sun is toward the lower left. The bright sides of the clouds which face the sun are brighter than the surrounding cloud deck because they are more directly exposed to the sun. Shadows can be seen on the side opposite the sun. These shadows are less distinct at short wavelengths (violet filter) and more distinct at long wavelengths (orange filter). This can be understood if the underlying cloud deck on which the shadow is cast is at a relatively great depth, in which case scattering by molecules in the overlying atmosphere will diffuse light into the shadow. Because molecules scatter blue light much more efficiently than red light, the shadows will be darkest at the longest (reddest) wavelengths, and will appear blue under white light illumination. The resolution of this image is 11 kilometers (6.8 miles per pixel) and the range is only 157,000 kilometers (98,000 miles). The width of the cloud streaks range from 50 to 200 kilometers (31 to 124 miles), and their shadow widths range from 30 to 50 kilometers (18 to 31 miles). Cloud heights appear to be of the order of 50 kilometers (31 miles). This corresponds to 2 scale heights.

    The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Triton, Detailansicht der nördlichen Hemisphäre

    Triton, Detailansicht der nördlichen Hemisphäre

    This is one of the most detailed views of the surface of Triton taken by Voyager 2 on its flyby of the large satellite of Neptune early in the morning of Aug. 25, 1989. The picture was stored on the tape recorder and relayed to Earth later. Taken from a distance of only 40,000 km (25,000 miles), the frame is about 220 kilometers (140 miles) across and shows details as small as 750 meters (0.5 miles). Most of the area is covered by a peculiar landscape of roughly circular depressions separated by rugged ridges. This type of terrain, which covers large tracts of Triton's northern hemisphere, is unlike anything seen elsewhere in the solar system. The depressions are probably not impact craters: They are too similar in size and too regularly spaced. Their origin is still unknown, but may involve local melting and collapse of the icy surface. A conspicuous set of grooves and ridges cuts across the landscape, indicating fracturing and deformation of Triton's surface. The rarity of impact craters suggests a young surface by solarsystem standards, probably less than a few billion years old.

    The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Neptun, zwei globale Ansichten, 12 Mill. Km Entfernung

    Neptun, zwei globale Ansichten, 12 Mill. Km Entfernung

    These two images of Neptune were taken by Voyager 2's narrow angle camera when the spacecraft was about 12 million km (7.5 million miles) from Neptune. Resolution is about 110 km (68 miles) per pixel. During the 17.6 hours between the left and right images, the Great Dark Spot, at 22 degrees south latitude (left of center), has completed a little less than one rotation of Neptune. The smaller dark spot, at 54 south, completed a little more than one rotation, as can be seen by comparing its relative positions in the two pictures. The Great Dark Spot and the smaller spot have a relative velocity of 100 meters per second (220 miles an hour). The light and dark bands circling Neptune indicate predominantly zonal (east/west) motion. The diffuse white feature north of the Great Dark Spot is near Neptune's equator, and rotates with about the same period as the Great Dark Spot. Streak of bright clouds at the south edge, and just east of the Great Dark Spot, are its constant companions, and change the details of their appearance, often within a few hours. Changing brightness of the cloud streaks could be a result of vertical motions.

    The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Triton, globales hochauflösendes Farbmosaik

    Triton, globales hochauflösendes Farbmosaik

    Global color mosaic of Triton, taken in 1989 by Voyager 2 during its flyby of the Neptune system. Color was synthesized by combining high-resolution images taken through orange, violet, and ultraviolet filters; these images were displayed as red, green, and blue images and combined to create this color version. With a radius of 1,350 (839 mi), about 22% smaller than Earth's moon, Triton is by far the largest satellite of Neptune. It is one of only three objects in the Solar System known to have a nitrogen-dominated atmosphere (the others are Earth and Saturn's giant moon, Titan). Triton has the coldest surface known anywhere in the Solar System (38 K, about -391 degrees Farenheit); it is so cold that most of Triton's nitrogen is condensed as frost, making it the only satellite in the Solar System known to have a surface made mainly of nitrogen ice. The pinkish deposits constitute a vast south polar cap believed to contain methane ice, which would have reacted under sunlight to form pink or red compounds. The dark streaks overlying these pink ices are believed to be an icy and perhaps carbonaceous dust deposited from huge geyser-like plumes, some of which were found to be active during the Voyager 2 flyby. The bluish-green band visible in this image extends all the way around Triton near the equator; it may consist of relatively fresh nitrogen frost deposits. The greenish areas includes what is called the cataloupe terrain, whose origin is unknown, and a set of 'cryovolcanic' landscapes apparently produced by icy-cold liquids (now frozen) erupted from Triton's interior.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Neptun, globale Ansicht

    Neptun, globale Ansicht

    This picture of Neptune was produced from the last whole planet images taken through the green and orange filters on the Voyager 2 narrow angle camera. The images were taken at a range of 4.4 million miles from the planet, 4 days and 20 hours before closest approach. The picture shows the Great Dark Spot and its companion bright smudge; on the west limb the fast moving bright feature called Scooter and the little dark spot are visible. These clouds were seen to persist for as long as Voyager's cameras could resolve them. North of these, a bright cloud band similar to the south polar streak may be seen.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Neptun und Triton aus Sicht einer Raumsonde, die Triton anfliegt, Montage

    Neptun und Triton aus Sicht einer Raumsonde, die Triton anfliegt, Montage

    This computer-generated montage shows Neptune as it would appear from a spacecraft approaching Triton, Neptune's largest moon at 2706 km (1683 mi) in diameter. The wind- and sublimation-eroded south polar cap of Triton is shown at the bottom of the Triton image, a cryovolcanic terrain at the upper right, and the enigmatic 'cantaloupe terrain' at the upper left. Triton's surface is mostly covered by nitrogen frost mixed with traces of condensed methane, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. The tenuous atmosphere of Triton, though only about one- hundredth of one percent of Earth's atmospheric density at the surface, is thick enough to produce wind-deposited streaks of dark and bright materials of unknown composition in the south polar cap region. The southern polar cap was sublimating at the time of the Voyager 2 flyby, as indicated by the irregular and eroded appearance of the edge of the cap. The polar frosts were sublimating because Triton's orbital and rotational motion causes the sun to shine directly on the polar cap for a period of several decades during Neptune's and Triton's long austral summer. Though the polar cap was undergoing 'heat death', surface temperatures still were only about 38 K (-391 degrees Fahrenheit).

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Die Neptunringe

    Die Neptunringe

    In Neptune's outermost ring, 39,000 miles out, material mysteriously clumps into three arcs. Voyager 2 acquired this image as it encountered Neptune in August of 1989.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Neptun, kleiner dunkler Fleck in der Atmosphäre

    Neptun, kleiner dunkler Fleck in der Atmosphäre

    This bulls-eye view of Neptune's small dark spot (D2) was obtained by Voyager 2's narrow-angle camera on Aug. 24, 1989, when Voyager 2 was within 1.1 million km (680,000 miles) of the planet. The smallest structures that can be seen are 20 km (12 miles) across. This unplanned photograph was obtained when the infrared spectrograph was mapping the planet, and is the highest resolution view of the feature taken during the flyby. Banding surrounding the feature indicates unseen strong winds, while structures within the bright spot suggest both active upwelling of clouds and rotation about the center. A rotation rate has not yet been measured, but the V-shaped structure near the right edge of the bright area indicates that the spot rotates clockwise. Unlike the Great Red Spot on Jupiter, which rotates counterclockwise, if the D2 spot on Neptune rotates clockwise, the material will be descending in the dark oval region. The fact that infrared data will yield temperature information about the region above the clouds makes this observation especially valuable.

    The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Neptunringe während der größten Annäherung

    Neptunringe während der größten Annäherung

    The Voyager spacecraft took this picture after closest approach to Neptune on Aug. 25 1989, using the clear filter of the wide- angle camera with an exposure time of 255 seconds. The view back towards Neptune at a phase angle of 135 degrees found the two known rings to be five to 10 times brighter than seen in backscattering during Voyager approach at much lower phase angle. This brightness increase implies a large percentage of microscopic particles within the rings. Although the dominant arc-like clump of the outer ring is not seen here, the inner ring appears brighter than the outer ring at the longitudes seen in this image. A faint sheet of material is also revealed that extends from the faint ring at a radius of 53,200 kilometers (33,000 miles). A new and even fainter ring was discovered in this image at about 41,000 kilometers (25,400 miles), seen running from the lower left corner to about one-third the way across the top of the frame. This ring is quite broad, about 2,500 kilometers (1,550 miles) in radial width. In contrast to the two previously discovered rings, this feature is quite diffuse and has no well defined radial boundaries. The Voyager imaging experiment has now detected ring material in all of the radial regions in which it has been detected by groundbased stellar occultation experiments. The Voyager spacecraft was 720,000 kilometers (446,400 miles) from Neptune at the time of this exposure. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Triton, globale Farbansicht aus 4 Mill. km Entfernung

    Triton, globale Farbansicht aus 4 Mill. km Entfernung

    Voyager 2 obtained this color image of Triton at a distance of 4 million kilometers (2.5 million miles) at 1 a.m. PDT on Aug. 22, 1989. The picture was made by combining images taken through the green, clear and violet filters. The smallest features seen are about 74 kilometers (46 miles) across. The south pole of Triton is currently tipped toward the sun and it is summer in the southern hemisphere. The south pole is located about a quarter of the way up from the bottom of the image. The bright band near the top of the image nearly coincides with the equator of Triton. One prominent and several smaller bright, wispy streaks extend from the band into the darker northern hemisphere. The prominent wispy streak shows a bluish-white color while the darker northern hemisphere is reddish in color. This may indicate that the streak is freshly deposited frost while the red color in the northern hemisphere may result from methane frost that has been darkened by radiation. Individual markings appear to rotate with the satellite and retain their shapes indicating they are indeed surface features and not in the tenuous atmosphere. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Neptunmond Triton als Sichel

    Neptunmond Triton als Sichel

    Voyager 2 obtained this parting shot of Triton, Neptune's largest satellite, shortly after closest approach to the moon and passage through its shadow on the morning of Aug. 25, 1989. The distance to Triton was 90,000 kilometers (56,000 thousand miles) and the phase angle was 155 degrees, so that only a thin crescent of Triton's south polar region can be seen. This image was assembled using the green, blue and violet filters of Voyager's wide angle camera. Faint linear markings near the center of the crescent may be shadows case by surface features or by clouds, and the brightness of the left (western) horn of the crescent compared to the right horn may be a result of variable haze in the atmosphere.

    The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

    © NASA/JPL

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  • Neptunmond Triton, Teil des „Cantaloupe“-Gebiets

    Neptunmond Triton, Teil des „Cantaloupe“-Gebiets

    This view of the volcanic plains of Neptune's moon Triton was produced using topographic maps derived from images acquired by NASA's Voyager spacecraft during its August 1989 flyby, 20 years ago this week.

    Triton, Neptune's largest moon, was the last solid object visited by the Voyager 2 spacecraft on its epic 10-year tour of the outer solar system. The rugged terrain in the foreground is Triton's infamous cantaloupe terrain, most likely formed when the icy crust of Triton underwent wholesale overturn, forming large numbers of rising blobs of ice (diapirs). The numerous irregular mounds are a few hundred meters (several hundred feet) high and a few kilometers (a few miles) across and formed when the top of the crust buckled during overturn. The large walled plains are of unknown origin, although the irregular pit in the center of the background walled plain may be volcanic in nature. These plains are approximately 152 meters (500 feet) deep and 200 to 250 kilometers (124 to 155 miles) across.

    The surface of Triton is very rugged, scarred by rising blobs of ice, faults and volcanic pits and lava flows composed of water and other ices. The surface is also extremely young and sparsely cratered, and could be geologically active today. This scene is on the order of 150 meters (500 feet).

    Bild: NASA/JPL/Universities Space Research Association/Lunar and Planetary Institute

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  • Neptun, vollständiges Ringsystem, Langzeitbelichtung

    Neptun, vollständiges Ringsystem, Langzeitbelichtung

    This pair of Voyager 2 images (FDS 11446.21 and 11448.10), two 591-s exposures obtained through the clear filter of the wide-angle camera, show the full ring system with the highest sensitivity. Visible in this figure are the bright, narrow N53 and N63 rings, the diffuse N42 ring, and (faintly) the plateau outside of the N53 ring (with its slight brightening near 57,500 km).

    Bild: NASA/JPL

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  • Neptun, globale Ansicht mit dunklem Fleck und dunklerer nördlicher Hemisphäre

    Neptun, globale Ansicht mit dunklem Fleck und dunklerer nördlicher Hemisphäre

    In observations taken on September 7th, researchers found that Neptune’s dark spot, which recently was found to have reversed course from moving toward the equator, is still visible in this image, along with a darkened northern hemisphere. There is also a notable dark, elongated circle encompassing Neptune’s south pole. Neptune's and Uranus’ blue color is a result of the absorption of red light by the planets’ methane-rich atmosphere, combined with the same Rayleigh-scattering process that makes the Earth's sky blue. In 2021, there are few bright clouds on Neptune, and its distinct blue with a singular large dark spot is very reminiscent of what Voyager 2 saw in 1989.

    Bild:
    SCIENCE: NASA, ESA, Amy Simon (NASA-GSFC), Michael H. Wong (UC Berkeley)
    IMAGE PROCESSING: Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

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  • künstlerische Darstellung des Neptunmonds Hippocamp

    künstlerische Darstellung des Neptunmonds Hippocamp

    This is an artist's concept of the tiny moon Hippocamp that was discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2013. Only 20 miles across, it may actually be a broken-off fragment from a much larger neighboring moon, Proteus, seen as a crescent in the background. This is the first evidence for a moon being an offshoot from a comet collision with a much larger parent body.

    Bild: NASA, ESA, and J. Olmsted (STScI)

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